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Department of Agriculture



Green Purchasing Affirmative Procurement Program



USDA



June 30, 2006



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This document formally establishes the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Green Purchasing Affirmative Procurement Program (GPAPP). Green Purchasing is defined as the purchasing and use of designated recycled content, ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient, biobased, and environmentally preferable products and services. Collectively, these items are referred to as green products and services. The GPAPP establishes department-wide guidance and implements guidelines for an effective green purchasing program that encompasses the purchasing and use of designated recycled content, ENERGY STAR®, energy-efficient, biobased, and environmentally preferable products.

USDA's GPAPP has been developed to ensure that green products will be purchased to their maximum extent practicable and fulfills the applicable affirmative procurement requirements of section 6002 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), section 104 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT), and section 9002 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (FSRIA).

Annually, the USDA purchases billions of dollars of products and services. The use of green products by USDA holds the promise of:

This GPAPP is a living document and shall be amended as appropriate to implement additional requirements of future laws, Executive Orders, the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), and the Agriculture Acquisition Regulations (AGAR) on the purchasing of green products.

Questions on compliance and implementation issues in this guidance may be directed to:

Sharon Holcombe
USDA
DA/OPPM
Chief, Energy and Environment Division
(202) 720-3820
E-mail: sharon.holcombe@usda.gov

Shana Love
USDA
Special Assistant, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration
(202) 205-4008
E-mail: shana.love@usda.gov

Mike Green
USDA
DA/OPPM
Program Manager, Biobased Procurement Program
(202) 720-7921
E-mail: mike.green@usda.gov


Executive Summary

Acronyms

1.0 Purpose and Authorities, Applicability, Scope, Roles, and Responsibilities

Purpose and Authorities

Applicability

Scope of Green Products

1.3.1 Recycled Content Products

1.3.2 ENERGY STAR® and FEMP Designated Energy Efficient Products

1.3.3 Biobased Products

1.3.4 Environmentally Preferable Products

1.4 Program Implementation Roles and Responsibilities

1.4.1 USDA Assistant Secretary for Administration (ASA)

1.4.2 Head of Contracting Activity Designees (HCADs)

1.4.3 Contracting Officers

Program/Requirements Personnel

1.4.5 Purchase Card Holders

2.0 Affirmative Procurement Program

Policy

Part 1. Green Products Preference Program

Recycled Content Products

2.2.2 ENERGY STAR® and Energy Efficient Products

2.2.3 Biobased Products

2.2.4 Environmentally Preferable Products (EPP)

2.2.5 Justifications

2.2.6 Acquisition Planning and Specifications

2.2.7 Small Business Set-Asides

2.2.8 Source Selection/Evaluation

2.2.9 Procurement Resources

2.2.10 Future Procurement Activities to Support Green Preference Program

2.3 Part 2. Promotion Program

2.3.1 Outreach

2.3.1.1 On-Going Outreach

2.3.1.2 Future Outreach

2.3.2 Training

2.3.2.1 Present Training

2.3.2.2 Future Training

2.4 Part 3. Annual Reviewing and Monitoring of the GPAPP

2.4.1 Annual Monitoring and Review

2.4.1.1 Goals

2.4.1.2 Performance Measures

2.4.2 Annual Reports

2.4.2.1 Future Reporting Requirements/Methods

3.0 Annual Recognition Programs

3.1 Closing the Circle Award (CTC)

3.2 Presidential Award for Leadership in Federal Energy Management

3.3 Green Purchasing Award

Appendix A – Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Green Purchasing Requirements

Appendix B – Agriculture Acquisition Regulation (AGAR) Green Purchasing Requirements

Appendix C – Sample Section L, Instructions to Offerors

Appendix D – Sample Section M, Evaluation Factors for Award

Appendix E – Contracts Targeted for Insertion of Biobased Language Based on Review of Procurement Forecasts

Appendix F – Sample Template on Custodial Services

Appendix G – Sample Template on Vehicle Maintenance

Appendix H – Sample Template on Maintenance and Repair

Appendix I – AGAR Advisory on FedBizOps Solicitation Descriptions

Appendix J – Deputy Secretary's Memorandum on Energy and Fuel Conservation Actions

Appendix K – Buy Biobased Brochure

Appendix L – Green Purchasing Success Stories

Appendix M – Environmental Management System Policy

Appendix N – Reporting/Implementation Plan for Executive Order 13123

Appendix O – Closing the Circle Award


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ACRONYMS

ACC   Agriculture Acquisition Circular
AEE Agency Environmental Executive
AGAR Agriculture Acquisition Regulation
APP Affirmative Procurement Program
ARS Agricultural Research Service
ASA Assistant Secretary for Administration
ASTM American Society for Testing Materials
BA Beltsville Area
BARC Beltsville Agricultural Research Center
BEES Building for Environment and Economic Sustainability
BPA Blanket Purchase Agreements
CAAC Civilian Agency Acquisition Council
CPAIS Corporate Property Asset Information System
CPG Comprehensive Procurement Guideline
CTC Closing the Circle
DA Departmental Administration
DARC Defense Acquisition Regulatory Council
DAU Defense Acquisition University
DoD Department of Defense
DOE Department of Energy
DR Departmental Regulation
EMS Environmental Management Systems
EO Executive Order
EPA Environmental Protection Agency
EPACT Energy Policy Act
EPEAT Electronic Products Environmental Assessment Tool
EPP Environmentally Preferable Products
FAI Federal Acquisition Institute
FAR Federal Acquisition Regulation
FB4P Federal Biobased Products Preferred Procurement Program
FedBizOpps Federal Business Opportunities
FEE Federal Environmental Executive
FEMP Federal Energy Management Program
FPDS Federal Procurement Data System
FSRIA Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002
GAO Government Accountability Office
GPAPP Green Purchasing Affirmative Procurement Program
GPRA Government Performance Results Act
GSA General Services Administration
HCAD Head of Contracting Designee
IAS Integrated Acquisition System
ITS Information Technology Service
JWOD Javits-Wagner-O'Day Act
LEED Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
NIST National Institute of Standards and Technology
MOU Memorandum of Understanding
OCIO Office of Chief Information Officer
OFEE Office of the Federal Environmental Executive
OFPP Office of Federal Procurement Policy
OMB Office of Management and Budget
OPPM Office of Procurement and Property Management
OSDBU Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization
PCMS Purchase Card Management System
PBS Public Broadcasting Service
RCRA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
RMAN Recovered Materials Advisory Notice
UNICOR Federal Prison Industries, Inc.
USDA United Stated Department of Agriculture

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1.0 PURPOSE AND AUTHORITIES, APPLICABILITY, SCOPE, ROLES, AND RESPONSIBILITIES

1.1 Purpose and Authorities

The purpose of this document is to formally establish the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Green Purchasing Affirmative Procurement Program (GPAPP). The programs covered are recycled content, ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient, biobased, and environmentally preferable products (EPP). This GPAPP fulfills the affirmative procurement requirements of section 6002 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), section 104 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT), section 9002 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (FSRIA), and Executive Orders (EOs) 13101, 13123, and 13221.

Through this document, USDA's objective is to enhance and sustain mission readiness through cost-effective acquisition that achieves compliance and reduces resource consumption by increasing USDA's purchases of green products and services to their maximum extent possible. Other objectives include the education of USDA employees, the expansion of the green products market, and reduction of energy usage. Additionally, the GPAPP outlines department-wide guidance for an effective green purchasing program; and contains a preference program, a promotion program to promote the preference program, and an annual review and monitoring of the effectiveness of the GPAPP.

1.2 Applicability

The policies outlined in this GPAPP apply to USDA as a whole and all USDA agencies, program offices, operations offices, sites, and applicable contractors. The policies apply to USDA agency purchases, including those at or below the micro-purchase threshold. The requirements apply to direct purchases through contractors, Government purchase cards/fleet cards, support services contracts under which the designated products will be supplied or used, simplified acquisitions, and purchases made through Federal supply agencies.

1.3 Scope of Green Products

1.3.1 Recycled Content Products

Recycled content products are products that are made from or contain recovered materials. That means: replacing virgin materials with recycled materials, including post-consumer materials. Through the Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines (CPG), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) manages the program and designates recycled content products for Federal procurement. There are currently more than 60 designated products in eight categories: paper and paper products, vehicular, construction, landscaping, park and recreation, traffic control, non-paper office, and miscellaneous products. Examples of designated products include:

structural fiberboard, plastic lumber landscaping timbers and post, printing and writing papers, playground equipment, retread tires, and sorbents. The current list of designated products, EPA's guidance, and related technical information can be found on EPA's web site at www.epa.gov/cpg.

1.3.2 ENERGY STAR® and FEMP Designated Energy Efficient Products

As defined by section 104 of EPACT, an ENERGY STAR® product is a product that is rated for energy efficiency under an ENERGY STAR® program. These products use less energy to perform the same operation or function as a comparable piece of equipment; ENERGY STAR® is an example of a label that is identified with energy efficiency. EPA and the Department of Energy (DOE) jointly manage this program. Before using the ENERGY STAR® logo on a product, a manufacturer must become an ENERGY STAR® partner and self-certify that the product meets ENERGY STAR® performance eligibility criteria. Examples of ENERGY STAR® products include computers, copiers, clothes washers, dishwashers, light fixtures, and compact fluorescent light bulbs. The technical requirements that each product must meet to become ENERGY STAR® qualified are available at www.energystar.gov/products.

As defined by section 104 of EPACT, FEMP designated energy efficient products are designated under the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) of the DOE. These products are among the highest 25 percent of equivalent products for energy efficiency. FEMP also provides information on products that use low amounts of power in standby mode. For each product, FEMP identifies the efficiency levels needed to meet the requirements for procurement of energy-efficient products and provides a cost-effectiveness example. DOE's FEMP manages this program. Examples of FEMP designated products include electric and gas water heaters, ice machines, boilers, and chillers. This information can be found on FEMP's web site at http://www.eere.energy.gov/femp/procurement/index.cfm.

1.3.3 Biobased Products

As defined by section 9002 of FSRIA, a biobased product is a product determined by the Secretary of Agriculture to be a commercial or industrial product (other than food or feed) that is composed in whole, or in significant part, of biological products or renewable domestic agricultural materials (including plant, animal, and marine materials) or forestry materials. USDA manages the biobased program. Examples of USDA designated biobased products include mobile equipment hydraulic fluids, roof coatings, diesel fuel additives, and penetrating lubricants. Information on these designated products, USDA's guidance, and related documentation can be found at USDA's web site at www.usda.gov/biobased.

1.3.4 Environmentally Preferable Products

As defined by section 201 of Executive Order 13101, environmentally preferable products are products or services that have a lesser or reduced effect on human health and the environment when compared with competing products or services that serve the same purpose. This comparison may consider raw materials acquisition, production, manufacturing, packaging, distribution, reuse, operation, maintenance, or disposal of the products or services. This program is managed by EPA. While there is no list of EPP that requires mandatory Federal procurement, EPA maintains a database of products and specifications defined by Federal, state, and local agencies, and other nations. Many of the products in the database include products that have been designated in one or more of the other Green Purchasing categories. Examples of EPP include a printer that is ENERGY STAR®, prints on recycled paper and also has a two sided copying capability, paint with no or low volatile organic compounds, and 100 percent post-consumer paper that is not chemically de-inked and is process chlorine free. The database can be found at www.epa.gov/epp.

1.4 Program Implementation Roles and Responsibilities

USDA recognizes that the responsibility of implementing this GPAPP lies with every USDA employee. To this end, USDA is actively working to ensure that every person involved in the process, from the requirements planner to the administrative contracting officials as well as Government purchase card holders and persons requisitioning products or supplies through any source or supply or contract, will be informed of their role in the success of this program. This section outlines the roles for the USDA Assistant Secretary for Administration, Head of Contracting Activity Designees, contracting officers, program/requirements personnel, and purchase card holders.

1.4.1 USDA Assistant Secretary for Administration (ASA)

1.4.2 Head of Contracting Activity Designees (HCADs)

1.4.3 Contracting Officers

1.4.4 Program/Requirements Personnel

1.4.5 Purchase Card Holders

2.0 AFFIRMATIVE PROCUREMENT PROGRAM

2.1 Policy

USDA will provide a preference for designated recycled content, ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient, biobased, and environmentally preferable products. This preference shall be established in all USDA contracts when practical, in accordance with section 6002 of RCRA, section 104 of EPACT, section 9002 of FSRIA, and the FAR. Appendix A provides a summary of the FAR Parts that provide a preference for green products. By implementing this procurement preference, USDA's objective is to enhance and sustain mission readiness through cost-effective acquisition that achieves compliance and reduces resource consumption.

In addition to the FAR, the AGAR has been updated to include information on green purchasing; Appendix B provides information on each requirement. AGARS and Advisories shall be amended as appropriate to implement the requirements of section 104 of EPACT, section 9002 of FSRIA, and the FAR on the purchasing of green products, specifically the mandatory purchasing of designated ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient, and biobased products.

All USDA agencies are to implement this GPAPP which consists of the following elements: (1) a products preference program, (2) an agency promotion program, and (3) annual review and monitoring of the effectiveness of the Green Purchasing APP.

The preference for these products does not supersede the small business programs as defined in Part 19 of the FAR.

2.2 Part 1. Green Products Preference Program

2.2.1 Recycled Content Products

RCRA, section 6002 requires Federal agencies to procure EPA designated recycled content items composed of the highest percentage of recovered materials practicable consistent with maintaining a satisfactory level of competition. EO 13101, "Greening the Government Through Waste Prevention, Recycling, and Federal Acquisition," requires Federal agencies to increase the use of recovered materials by instituting procurement preferences for these products.

In addition, AGAR 423.403 states that it is the policy of USDA to acquire and use EPA designated recycled content products. AGAR 423.404 directs USDA agencies to include in all applicable solicitations and contracts, a preference for products and services, which meet or exceed the EPA purchasing guidelines as contained in the EPA product Recovered Materials Advisory Notices (RMANs). The AGAR further mandates that USDA agencies will require that 100% of purchases of EPA designated products contain recovered material unless the items cannot be acquired: (1) within a reasonable time frame, (2) meeting appropriate performance standards, or, (3) at a reasonable price. AGAR 423.404 reiterates that the threshold for EPA designated items is $10,000 per year at the USDA departmental, not individual agency, level; and stresses that the APP requirements, including the 100% purchase requirements, apply at the individual agency and staff office level.

There is a certification provision and an estimation clause on recovered material in FAR SubPart 23.406. The Recovered Material Certification provision, at 52.223-4, is inserted in solicitations that are for, or specify the use of, EPA designated products containing recovered materials. The Estimate of Percentage of Recovered Material Content for EPA designated products clause, at 52.223-9, is inserted in solicitations and contracts exceeding $100,000 that include the Recovered Material Certification provision at 52.223-4. AGAR 423.404 requires that USDA agencies will provide in writing to the USDA Procurement Executive, in response to a call for data for the RCRA Report, reasonable estimates, certification, and verification of recovered materials used in the performance of contracts.

2.2.2 ENERGY STAR® and Energy Efficient Products

The Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 2005, section 104 requires Federal agencies to purchase ENERGY STAR® qualified or DOE's FEMP designated products when procuring energy-consuming products. EO 13123, "Greening the Government Through Efficient Energy Management" directs Federal agencies to select, when life-cycle cost-effective, ENERGY STAR® labeled products or, for product groups where ENERGY STAR® programs do not yet exist, products that are in the upper 25 percent of energy efficiency as designated by FEMP. In addition, EO 13221, "Energy Efficient Standby Power Devices" mandates that each agency, when it purchases commercially available off-the-shelf products that use external standby power devices or contain an internal standby power function, will purchase products that use no more than one watt in standby power-consuming mode.

FAR Part 23 requires that Federal agencies purchase, where life-cycle cost-effective and available, energy using products that are ENERGY STAR® labeled or meet the requirements of FEMP product energy efficiency recommendations or FEMP low standby power recommendations. In addition, AGAR 423.202 provides information on ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient, and low standby products along with the appropriate web site tool.

In accordance with Section 401 of EO 13123, agencies and offices within USDA will use life-cycle cost analysis in making decisions about investments in products, services, construction, and other projects to lower the Department's costs and to reduce energy and water consumption. USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) is using life-cycle costing to identify opportunities to reduce capital and operating costs of a new major construction or renovation projects scheduled for a design award in Fiscal Year 2006.

USDA's new departmental regulation DR5500-001, "Facility Energy and Water Conservation and Utilities Management" issued June 19, 2006 also establishes policy requiring USDA agencies to: (1) purchase ENERGY STAR labeled products and FEMP designated energy efficient products, (2) include energy efficient specifications in procurement bids and evaluation, and (3) purchase equipment that uses no more than one watt of stand-by power, or if impracticable, purchase items with the lowest standby wattage available.

2.2.3 Biobased Products

FSRIA requires that Federal agencies purchase USDA designated biobased items. The one exemption to this rule is products designated by EPA take precedence over biobased products. FSRIA also states that each Federal agency that procures any items designated in such guidelines shall, in making procurement decisions, give preference to such items composed of the highest percentage of biobased products practicable, consistent with maintaining a satisfactory level of competition, considering such guidelines.

USDA's recommended materials content ranges, product specifications, and other product information can be obtained from USDA's web site at www.usda.gov/biobased. USDA shall give preference to procuring and using these designated biobased products.

USDA's published guidance on designated biobased products (see http//www.biobased.oce.usda.gov/FSRIA/03-31347.pdf) allows contracting officers to request life cycle assessments from vendors and contractors to use as part of their overall cost determination. These assessments may be provided based on tests using either the Building for Environment and Economic Sustainability (BEES) methodology developed by the Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) (see http://www.nist.gov/) or a third-party or in-house analysis using the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) standard D 7075 for evaluating and reporting on environmental performance of biobased products.

USDA prepared a FAR Case to implement the procurement requirements of FSRIA, section 9002, to amend FAR Parts 2, 7, 11, 12, 13, 23, 42, and 52. In addition, the draft USDA FAR rule on the procurement of designated biobased items requires the agency contracting officers to insert a certification provision on designated biobased products in all new solicitations and contracts for construction and other support services. This provision will require contracting officers to assure that vendors (1) provide written certification that their products meet the minimum content standards in the solicitation documents, (2) maintain copies of certification documents, and (3) produce copies of the written certification upon request. The FAR Council is actively working to amend the FAR to include the biobased procurement provisions of FSRIA, section 9002; the proposed rule should be forthcoming.

2.2.4 Environmentally Preferable Products (EPP)

EO 13101, "Greening the Government Through Waste Prevention, Recycling, and Federal Acquisition" encourages the purchasing of EPP. The EO states that executive agencies shall use principles concepts, and lessons from pilots and demonstration pilots, to the maximum extent practicable, in identifying and purchasing EPP.

FAR Part 23 states that agencies must maximize the utilization of EPP. In addition, AGAR 423.703 provides policy on the acquisition of EPP; it directs USDA to support Federal "green purchasing" principles in the acquisition of products and services that are environmentally preferable. AGAR 423.703 stresses that USDA activities will actively promote a preference for EPP in contacts with vendors, in written materials, and other appropriate opportunities.

2.2.5 Justifications

Section 6002 of RCRA and section 9002 of FSRIA, state that the decision not to procure recycled content and biobased products shall be based on a determination that such procurement items: (1) are not reasonably available within a reasonable period of time, (2) fail to meet the performance standards set forth in the applicable specifications, or, (3) fail to meet the reasonable performance standards of the procuring agencies; or are only available at an unreasonable price. This is reinforced in the present FAR Subpart 23.4 and AGAR 423.404 regarding exemptions for not purchasing recycled content products. Section 104 of EPACT, states that the decision not to procure an ENERGY STAR® or FEMP designated energy efficient product shall be based on a determination that an ENERGY STAR® product or FEMP designated product is not cost-effective over the life of the product taking energy cost savings into account, or not reasonably available to meet the functional requirements of the agency.

FAR Part 23.4 states that the contracting officer shall place in the contract file a written justification if an acquisition of EPA designated recycled content products above the micro-purchase threshold does not meet applicable minimum recovered material content recommended by EPA guidelines. The contracting officer shall give a copy of the written justification to the AEE. EO 13101 states that the rationale for not purchasing such items and a plan and timetable for increasing agency purchases of the designated recycled content items shall also be placed in the contract file and provided to the AEE.

2.2.6 Acquisition Planning and Specifications

USDA personnel involved in planning for acquisitions shall consider the use of green products from the beginning of acquisition planning. Agency program offices shall develop, review and revise specifications, product descriptions, and standards during the acquisition planning stage to enhance USDA's procurement of designated recycled content, ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient, biobased, and environmentally preferable products. For example, standards or specifications unrelated to performance or presenting barriers shall be revised or eliminated when reviewing or drafting procurement specifications. When revising USDA specifications, a preference shall be expressed for designated recycled content, ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient, biobased, and environmentally preferable products, to the maximum extent practicable.

USDA Headquarters added specification section 01029 "Environmentally Preferable Products and Services" to construction contracts. Specifications are being rewritten to add other green products.

2.2.7 Small Business Set-Asides

When two or more small businesses exist that can provide qualified designated recycled content, ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient, biobased, and environmentally preferable products as a prime contractor; the product should be set aside for small business. Furthermore, large prime contractors should consider small businesses that can provide these products, as subcontractors if the products are (1) reasonably available, (2) meet necessary performance standards, and (3) the items are available at a reasonable price.

2.2.8 Source Selection/Evaluation

In order to lead by example, USDA will add source selection factors that can be used when evaluating all service contracts containing designated recycled content, ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient, biobased and environmentally preferable products. USDA will consider a contractor's use and purchasing of the above products as a factor in evaluating the contractor's past performance. Refer to Appendix C for a Sample Section L, Instructions to Offerors and to Appendix D for a Sample Section M, Evaluation Factors for Award that contain designated biobased source selection factors.

2.2.9 Procurement Resources

USDA's Procurement Forecast - Procurement forecasts can be used to identify contract opportunities under which green products could be supplied or used. USDA completed the update of its Procurement Forecast System on June 23, 2006. The update added two biobased elements that will be used in Fiscal Year 2007 and every year there after to identify biobased product contract opportunities. Appendix E lists USDA contracts that were targeted by USDA from the fiscal year 2005 Procurement Forecast for insertion of language to add designated biobased products.

Templates/Model Language - Templates can be used to incorporate model language on green products and services into contracts. USDA has developed templates and sample biobased language on Custodial Services, Vehicle Maintenance, and Maintenance and Repair of Buildings. Appendices F, G, and H are copies of those templates incorporating biobased language. For an electronic version of the templates go to URL http://www.usda.gov/procurement/programs/biobased/contracttemplates.htm. Additional templates will be developed for other USDA contracts as measured in dollar amounts. USDA will continue to review service contracts such as facilities management, construction, food services, or any other type of contract and identify those contracts where language on green products can be inserted.

The following are three examples of how USDA agencies have incorporated green products into their contracts.

  1. USDA has recently issued a janitorial contract for the four building headquarters complex incorporating requirements for environmentally preferable products and/or biobased products. The USDA Headquarters South Building is the largest and most populous single USDA facility. This building is undergoing an eight phase major modernization, with each phase achieving more energy and environmental improvements, including purchase and use of more recycled content, energy efficient, and biobased products. Current recycled content products being contractually designated include: acoustic ceiling tile, gypsum dry wall, insulation, carpet, and steel building components.


  2. Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC) issued a new janitorial contract with the requirement to use environmentally preferable products. The hand towels and bathroom tissue are of recycled content. Currently used are biobased/biodegradable cleaners for various surfaces, disinfectants, carpet spotters, and hand soap.


  3. Slate roof replacements and roofs in new BARC construction contracts are being done with recycled content roofing tiles that have the appearance of slate, meet historical preservation standards, and are less expensive than slate. This became policy after replacing roofs on four buildings after the tornado in 2001.

Strategic Sourcing - Strategic sourcing can be used to leverage spending of green products in an effective and efficient manner. Headquarters USDA's Procurement Operations Division awarded a Blanket Purchase Agreement (BPA) for remanufactured laser and inkjet printer, fax machines, and toner cartridges, as well as toner drums and print heads for laser and inkjet printers and fax machines for the Office of Chief Information Officer (OCIO) Information Technology Service (ITS). The BPA will provide for the order of remanufactured cartridges where available. This BPA provides the ability to acquire these products for use by the USDA Service Center Agencies (Farm Service Agency, Natural Resources Conservation Service, and Rural Development Agency) and other agencies, agency offices, or agency divisions of USDA that are supported by the OCIO, ITS. USDA will continue to identify strategic sourcing opportunities for purchasing recycled content, ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient, biobased, and environmentally preferable products.

Competitive Sourcing - Competitive sourcing can be used to require bidders to adhere to USDA's GPAPP. When the Beltsville Area (BA) and the National Agricultural Library underwent an A-76 Competitive Sourcing competition, the Performance Work Statement required the bidders to detail how they, as service providers, would conform to all BA policies on energy conservation, environmental protection, and affirmative procurement. USDA will, in future Competitive Sourcing competitions, ensure that GPAPP requirements are incorporated.

FedBizOpps - Federal Business Opportunities (FedBizOpps) can be used by USDA to publicize their green business opportunities by posting information directly to FedBizOpps. It can also be used by vendors seeking Federal markets for their green products and services. On May, 23, 2006, USDA issued AGAR Advisory No. 82, titled "Requisite Language for Federal Business Opportunities (FedBizOpps) Solicitation Descriptions When Designated Biobased Items Are Included as Part of a USDA Contract Requirement." The Advisory standardized FedBizOpps synopsis language for USDA contract requirements that contain biobased products to improve a business's ability to identify UDSA contract requirements that contain biobased products. (For an electronic version of the Advisory see URL http://www.usda.gov/procurement/programs/biobased/procurementtools.htm).

Appendix I requires that the contracting officer shall ensure, when biobased products have been included in a contract requirement, that the following two sentences are incorporated into the Synopsis description submitted to the FedBizOpps: "This procurement requires the use of biobased products to the extent that such products are reasonably available, meet agency or relevant industry performance standards, and are reasonably priced. Where available, these products shall first be acquired from among qualified products that fall under the umbrella of items designated through the Federal Biobased Products Preferred Procurement Program (FB4P)."

2.2.10 Future Procurement Activities to Support Green Preference Program

Labeling Program - Section 9002 of FSRIA also directs the establishment of a voluntary program under which the Secretary authorizes biobased manufacturers to self-certify their products as a "U.S.D.A. Certified Biobased Product." Certified products that have been previously designated must meet the minimum criteria set in the designation final rule. This voluntary program will be launched in the near future.

Federal Supply Sources - USDA will continue to work with other Federal supply sources, such as the General Services Administration (GSA), the Javits-Wagner-O'Day (JWOD), the Defense Logistics Agency, Department of Defense (DoD) EMALL, and Federal Prison Industries, Inc. (UNICOR), to include and make green products easily identifiable. Procuring green products through these sources offers procurement officials the following advantages: (1) products have been competitively bid, and (2) products should meet procurement office's specifications.

For example, USDA is working to ensure that USDA Advantage! provides easy access to designated biobased products available on the catalog. USDA Advantage! is part of USDA's Integrated Acquisition System (IAS) "e-Alliance" initiative, an effort to better leverage USDA spending power to obtain better pricing, ordering methods, and delivery terms for commonly acquired items and services. USDA Advantage! can be accessed at https://usdaadvantage.gsa.gov/advgsa/advantage/main/start_page.do?store=USDA.

Mandatory Purchasing Programs - USDA will work to combine the requirements of this GPAPP with other mandatory programs and certifications, such as the JWOD program, to increase each program's effectiveness. To this end, USDA has partnered with JWOD personnel to incorporate recycled content products into JWOD's product offerings. USDA will work with them on helping to bring to market designated ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient, biobased, and environmentally preferable products.

Real Property and Management - USDA will work with the GSA's Public Building Service (PBS) to identify tools for incorporating green product and services requirements into real property acquisition and management (i.e., Federal owned/leased space, Government owned/contractor operated space, contractor owned/contractor operated space, tenant-maintained space, rehabilitation, renovation and maintenance, and new construction). Discussions will be conducted with the GSA real property acquisition and management personnel to update the Federal Government's Solicitation for Offer "model green lease" to incorporate green product requirements. All new USDA leases will include provisions that require the use of green products such as cleaning materials and others, where appropriate.

Sustainable Building Design - USDA's OPPM is facilitating facility-level participation in the Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). USDA signed the MOU at a recent White House Summit on Federal Sustainable Buildings. The draft USDA Departmental Regulation (DR) will require agencies to, as feasible, apply the ENERGY STAR® Building Design, and/or Laboratories for the 21st Century approach, and/or design for, at a minimum, a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver rating in the design and construction or major renovation of USDA owned buildings. USDA shall continue to seek opportunities for using green products in constructing sustainable buildings.

As an example of USDA's work in the sustainable design area, the USDA South Building Headquarter's modernization plan to achieve LEEDS certification requires that each new design phase incorporates additional environmental and energy requirements. Phase 4 is designed to achieve no less than 26 points under the LEED-Existing Building Green Building system and includes requirements for recycled content products, certified wood products, and EPP products and services.

Environmental Management Systems (EMS) - USDA's BARC has developed policy, BA #05-03, that combines its existing policies for the EMS and Affirmative Procurement into one policy under the umbrella of the EMS. USDA will work to add a green procurement section to its EMS.

Automatic Substitution - In Fiscal Year 2005, USDA initiated a pilot program for automatic substitution of recycled toner cartridges, when toner cartridges are ordered. USDA will continue to examine other green products that can be substituted for virgin products.

2.3 Part 2. Promotion Program

USDA will actively promote a preference for designated recycled content, ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient, biobased, and environmentally preferable products and the components of this GPAPP. Promotion will be internal as well as external and consists of two methods: outreach and training.

2.3.1 Outreach

2.3.1.1 On-Going Outreach

Support of Senior Leadership - The Deputy Secretary's Memorandum on Energy and Fuel Conservation Actions stresses the actions that USDA can implement to reduce energy and fuel use. One of the major actions is to procure and use energy efficient ENERGY STAR® rated equipment and products. Appendix J provides a variety of actions that USDA will take in response to hurricanes Katrina and Rita and is an excellent example of how senior level management can promote green purchasing programs.

Conferences - ARS's Headquarters Facilities Division will continue to send representatives to the Laboratories for the 21st Century Annual Conference.

Pilot Projects - In August 2005, Departmental Administration conducted a 3 month pilot project using biobased cafeteria-ware in the Jamie L. Whitten cafeteria. During this pilot project, the approach included: (1) a 100 percent replacement of current Styrofoam and plastic food service items with biobased products such as biobased cutlery, straws, hot and cold use cups, bowls, etc, all from commercial sources; (2) data collection from cafeteria patrons' comments on a daily basis; (3) partnering with BARC and the EPA to provide training to patrons on how to dispose of waste to prevent contamination with non-compostables and to compost the cafeteria residuals; (4) collecting biobased product and food residuals on a daily basis and in collaboration with BARC transporting and composting it at a composting facility and evaluating its compostability; and (5) use of the finished compost in the Whitten Building gardens. USDA considered the pilot a success. A Sources Sought request for biobased cafeteria service-ware has been submitted to FedBizOpps to identify greater numbers of companies that can provide quality biobased service ware, thus reducing overall costs through greater competition. These companies, along with others that may come online, will be included in the USDA's overall strategy for the re-competition for cafeteria services in Fiscal Year 2007.

Outreach Materials - USDA's OPPM has developed a Federal Biobased Products Preferred Procurement Program awareness brochure that explains, promotes and facilitates the implementation of the FB4P. The brochure detailing the components of the FB4P is provided in Appendix K.

Success Stories - Success stories are an essential part of outreach. Appendix L contains stories from the BARC, the Forest Service, and the Southern Plains Area of ARS on their purchasing of recycled, biobased, and environmentally preferable products and services. USDA will continue to compile success stories and place them on their web sites.

2.3.1.2 Future Outreach

A key component of external outreach is publicity. Other Federal agencies and the general public, particularly the manufacturing community, need to be aware of the GPAPP. A (nationwide) marketing and communication plan is being developed to raise this awareness. Components of that plan include:

Also, USDA plans to do other targeted outreach including:

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2.3.2 Training

2.3.2.1 Present Training

USDA training is conducted by a variety of methods, including in-house training sessions, web casts, other Federal training sources such as GSA and commercial training. Contracting officers are trained to comply with the FAR, including buy-recycled requirements. Buying green is a specific topic in the training agenda. The USDA procurement policy web site www.usda.gov/procurement/index.html is a primary means of communicating information to the USDA procurement community. This web site features a "tool kit" which includes a direct link to OFEE's green purchasing web site, www.ofee.gov and Acquisition Central, www.arnet.gov.

Training of USDA's purchase card holders is the responsibility of the USDA's Procurement Systems Division and the designated departmental agency program coordinators and local agency program coordinators. The primary training vehicles are on-line training tools, which include the Purchase Card Management System (PCMS) Micro-Purchase Guide. The PCMS Micro-Purchase Guide states the USDA policy to buy recycled products, explains why, and gives some examples. Departmental Regulation (DR) 5013-6, Use of the Purchase Card and Convenience Check, goes further to state the USDA policy on buying environmentally preferable products and services and defines biobased products. In accordance with part 18 of the DR, all non-warranted personnel must complete credit card training to receive a purchase card and micro-purchase authority.

Between the mandatory contracting officer required training and the required purchase card training, this covers the vast majority of personnel across USDA involved in buying non-commodity supplies and services. Also, some agencies within USDA conduct or participate in training activities on their own. BARC has developed online APP training for purchase card holders. Purchase card holders receive instructions about the course and the names of employees completing the training are monitored within the BARC staff to ensure that everyone has received training. An electronic manual detailing the program is distributed to procurement and contracting officials.

OPPM will continue to disseminate educational and awareness material (provided by FEMP and the "You Have the Power" campaign) to agency facility and energy managers. In addition to attending the Energy 2006 Conference and Certified Management courses, OPPM staff will also solicit participation in these courses and events from various USDA agency personnel.

OPPM will continue to promote awareness of energy requirements and reporting through enhancements to the USDA Corporate Property Asset Information System (CPAIS). Additionally, OPPM will continue to raise the level of participation and visibility of USDA in government-wide energy management initiatives while increasing the awareness of these initiatives within the Department. Specifically, OPPM will continue to facilitate facility-level participation in the Federal Electronics Challenge.

USDA has designed and implemented a web-based awareness curriculum for program, contracting officers, and contract specialists on the biobased requirements of section 9002 of FSRIA, benefits of designated biobased purchasing, methods and procedures for selecting designated biobased products, and incorporating designated biobased purchasing into daily operations. That web-based training program is being incorporated into USDA's AgLearn site at the present time.

USDA has conducted procurement forecast training for small business coordinators and specialists on the new procurement forecast. This training also includes information on how the forecast will be used in conjunction with the biobased procurement program.

2.3.2.2 Future Training

Acquisition, procurement, supply, and program personnel receive training from various sources, specifically, the Federal Acquisition Institute (FAI), the Defense Acquisition University (DAU), and in general, through USDA provided training programs. USDA's OPPM and AgLearn staff will work with FAI and DAU, as resources allow, to develop and post available courses to reflect the requirements of section 6002 of RCRA, section 104 of EPACT, and section 9002 of FSRIA. USDA, through AgLearn, will provide training and refresher training to program managers and purchase card holders concerning green products. Training can consist of agency-sponsored workshops, electronic training, manuals, and web-based training. Training for USDA purchase card holders is essential because of the large volume of transactions and dollars handled by USDA credit card holders.

USDA will ensure that training is established at all levels (i.e., new employee training, refresher training, and office staff training).

USDA agencies will ensure relevant energy management training and awareness materials are provided to both procurement and facility management personnel. Appropriate personnel will also be encouraged to attend training programs and workshops provided by FEMP, private and public institutions, and other Federal agencies. For instance, the building engineer, building manager, and maintenance mechanics within the National Agricultural Library will be required to take training and educational lectures that focus on energy management issues.

USDA will also work with OFPP and OFEE to revise and update the biobased module in the online green purchasing training course that OFPP and OFEE have developed with the Office of Personnel Management's USALearning program.

USDA will create curriculum on biobased products and procurement for classroom use.

USDA will develop a green purchasing module that can be inserted into its EMS training. BARC has already demonstrated progress in this area by providing information in Appendix M.

2.4 Part 3. Annual Reviewing and Monitoring of the GPAPP

2.4.1 Annual Monitoring and Review

For each green product that it purchases, USDA will review the available data on purchases of these green products. Internal reviews and audits can be used to review and assess the progress that USDA is making with its GPAPP.

2.4.1.1 Goals

Recycled Content Products - All new purchase card holders will be trained on the purchasing of recycled content products.

USDA will make a variety of recycled products available to its purchase card holders and other orderers through BPAs.

ENERGY STAR® and Energy Efficient Products - All new USDA contracts for office equipment will include clauses requiring ENERGY STAR® or energy efficient products as appropriate.

Biobased Products - By FY 2012, USDA will increase the number of contracts issued that contain designated biobased products by 50 percent over a base year to be created in Fiscal Year 2007.

Environmentally Preferable Products (EPP) - USDA will initiate one EPP pilot every year beginning in Fiscal Year 2007.

2.4.1.2 Performance Measures

Recycled Content Products - In Fiscal Year 2008, USDA will document that a minimum of 80 percent of new (July 1, 2006 forward) purchase card holders have been trained on the purchasing of recycled products.

By Fiscal Year 2008, USDA will increase the documented recycled product purchases from BPAs by 25 percent from FY 2005 levels.

ENERGY STAR® and Energy Efficient Products - By 2008, at least 60 percent of USDA new contracts for office equipment will include clauses requiring ENERGY STAR® or energy efficient products as appropriate.

Biobased Products - USDA will create a baseline for the number of USDA contracts issued during FY 2007 that contain designated and non-designated biobased products.

Beginning in FY 2008 through FY 2012, the number of contracts issued by USDA that contain designated and non-designated biobased products will increase 10 percent over the previous year's accomplishments.

Environmentally Preferable Products - USDA will document one EPP case study each year beginning in Fiscal Year 2007 and beyond.

2.4.2 Annual Reports

Recycled Content Products
Section 6002 of RCRA requires the OFPP to report to Congress biennially on the actions taken by Federal agencies and the progress made in the implementation of section 6002. EO 13101 similarly required the OFEE to report on Federal agencies' waste prevention, recycling, and affirmative procurement activities. In an effort to develop a more efficient and less burdensome reporting process, the RCRA Report to Congress consolidated the two reporting requirements and is a collaborative effort by the OFPP and OFEE. The OFPP and OFEE transmit a data call to agencies annually on their purchasing of recycled content products, specifications, Affirmative Procurement policy, training, auditing, and goals. This information is incorporated into the RCRA Report to Congress.

USDA's AEE is responsible for tracking the Department's purchasing of designated recycled content products and reporting this information to the OFPP and the OFEE. USDA's AEE must also report on USDA's compliance with requirements to review and revise specifications, product descriptions, and standards to enhance the procurement of designated recycled content products. In Fiscal Year 2003, USDA established an Office Products Blanket Purchase Agreement (BPA) with Boise Cascade Office Products Federal; use of this BPA has grown each year. USDA has undertaken efforts to "green" the BPA by offering and promoting recycled products, remanufactured products and ENERGY STAR® products. This BPA is available for use by USDA's purchase card holders, and it also sells products to the USDA Headquarters Central Supply Operations for redistribution to USDA customers. USDA does have highly reliable recycled product purchase information for Fiscal Year 2005 from the USDA Office Products BPA. USDA will continue to ensure future BPAs specify green products and require the supplier to provide data to USDA on purchases of green products.

USDA is collecting anecdotal data from agencies on their success stories of purchasing recycled content products. This information will be published on the USDA web sites.

ENERGY STAR® and Energy Efficient Products
DOE submits an annual report to the President on its progress in meeting the goals and requirements of EO 13123. FEMP, in consultation with OMB develops and issues guidelines for agencies' preparation of their annual reports to the President on energy management and implementation of EO 13123. FEMP collects and analyses all the agencies' data and in consultation with the OMB transmits the annual report to the President. USDA measures and reports on its progress in meeting the goals and requirements of EO 13123 on an annual basis to DOE. USDA provides information and data on outreach programs that include education, training, and promotion of ENERGY STAR®, other energy efficient products, and low standby power products for Federal purchase card users. Data is requested on the use of ENERGY STAR® and other energy efficient products, ENERGY STAR® buildings, sustainable building design, and energy efficiency in leased provisions. Appendix N contains the latest USDA Fiscal Year 2006 Report on Energy Management Activities that was submitted to FEMP.

As stated above, the USDA Office Products BPA offers and promotes ENERGY STAR® products. Data can be collected by USDA on these products.

USDA is collecting anecdotal data from agencies on their success stories of purchasing ENERGY STAR® and energy efficient products. This information will be published on the USDA web sites.

Biobased Products
Section 9002 of FSRA requires the OFPP to report to Congress biennially on agency implementation. USDA's AEE is responsible for tracking the Department's purchasing of designated biobased products and reporting this information to the OFPP and the OFEE. USDA's AEE must also report on USDA's compliance with requirements to review and revise specifications, product descriptions, and standards to enhance the procurement of designated biobased products. OFPP has not yet developed the reporting requirements for this submission. Once those official reporting requirements are established, USDA will provide data to OFPP and the OFEE annually for this report.

In the interim, in order to stay proactive, USDA worked with OFPP and OFEE personnel to insert biobased data elements to the Data Call. There are questions on (1) whether biobased products, other than biobased fuels were purchased or tested; (2) policies, procedures, or plans that have been amended to implement the procurement of biobased products as required by section 9002 of FSRIA; (3) training about biobased products procurement; and (4) the goal for purchases of biobased products.

USDA is collecting anecdotal data from agencies on their success stories of purchasing biobased products. This information will be published on the USDA web sites.

Environmentally Preferable Products
There are questions on the Data Call concerning EPP. Agencies including USDA are expected to respond to the following items: (1) purchasing of EPP; (2) a goal for increasing the use of EPP; and (3) the measurement of progress toward the goal.

USDA is collecting anecdotal data from agencies on their success stories of purchasing EPP. This information will be published on the USDA web sites.

2.4.2.1 Future Reporting Requirements/Methods

USDA will continue to investigate the following reporting areas that could improve, streamline, and simplify reporting and tracking of USDA's purchases of designated recycled content, ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient, biobased, and environmentally preferable products.

OFPP and OFEE have formulated a Reporting Inter-Agency Working Group to review all reporting and tracking requirements for green products. Infrastructure data such as number of procurement personnel trained, number of purchase card holders trained, and other data will be discussed as to ease of collection and analysis. Data systems and elements that are inefficient will also be examined. USDA is an active participant of this Working Group.

Advances in technology have resulted in the emergence of Federal electronic catalogs and increased use of them. USDA will work to modify electronic catalogs to accommodate green product data collection and reporting requirements.

USDA will work with OFEE, OFPP, and other agencies to ascertain the feasibility of revising the Federal Procurement Data System (FPDS) to include data fields that verify whether or not a contract requires designated recycled content, ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient, biobased, and environmentally preferable products.

USDA will investigate the feasibility of placing biobased data fields in the USDA automated financing/procurement writing system as a pilot. These data fields could contain information on whether biobased items are included in the contract and the dollar value of the biobased items in the contract. Upon the success of the biobased pilot, there could be a transition to adding data fields for designated recycled content, ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient and environmentally preferable products.

3.0 ANNUAL RECOGNITION PROGRAMS

3.1 Closing the Circle Award (CTC)

The White House CTC Awards are presented annually by the White House to the best, most innovative green purchasing programs. The CTC awards recognize outstanding achievements of Federal employees and their facilities for efforts that resulted in significant contributions to, or have made a significant positive impact regarding its environmental stewardship. Green Purchasing is one of the categories in the CTC Awards. In the 2006 CTC Green Purchasing category, the focus was on biobased products. Nominees were required to demonstrate how they started to purchase biobased products through pilot projects, product testing, education, and outreach to facility staff, development of solicitation or contract language, etc. Preference was given to programs that consisted of both a buy bio component and either a buy recycled component or an environmentally preferable products component. Every year, the criteria for the Green Purchasing category changes; in past years, it has focused entirely on the purchasing of recycled content products, or a nominee who demonstrated successful performance in buying both recycled content and environmentally preferable products.

BARC has received White House CTC Awards for its use of biobased products, biodiesel fuel leadership, and Environmental Management Systems. A description of the award nomination is provided in Appendix O. It is important that USDA continue to demonstrate leadership and aspire to win national recognition for their green purchasing efforts.

Section 9002 of FSRIA requires USDA to establish an annual awards program to recognize Federal agencies and private entities that have been successful and innovative in utilizing designated biobased products. USDA plans to initiate this awards program one year following the initial designation of biobased items.

3.2 Presidential Award for Leadership in Federal Energy Management

EO 13123 requires Federal agencies to improve energy efficiency and management. Section 306(2) of the EO states that the Deputy Director for Management at the OMB shall also select outstanding agency energy management team(s) from among candidates nominated by DOE, for a new Presidential Award for Energy Efficiency. The Administration will grant the Presidential Award for Leadership in Federal Energy Management to agency team(s) that have excelled in the use of energy efficiency and management tools specified in the EO. Winners of the Presidential Award for Leadership in Federal Energy Management (Presidential Awards) will be selected only from the nominations submitted by DOE's FEMP. One of the categories in the Presidential Award is Implementation; this category includes use of the energy efficiency tools identified in EO 13123 such as purchasing energy efficient products, using sustainable building design, and developing model leasing. Another category is Outreach; this category includes outreach methods used to communicate the EO tools.

FEMP presents annually the Federal Energy and Water Management Awards (Federal Awards). Federal awardees are selected from outstanding Federal employees and contributors who have demonstrated leadership and exemplary efforts in energy and water management; use of renewable and distributed energy resources; practices that improve energy security, increased efficiency of mobile equipment; and any other area that may merit recognition. Selection criteria definitions include: sustainable whole building approach and outreach activities.

USDA encourages its employees' commitment to improving energy efficiency through awards and recognition programs. USDA will continue to participate in the Annual Federal Energy and Water Management Awards program and the "You Have the Power" recognition program. USDA submits annually nominations for these award programs to recognize outstanding energy efficiency efforts. The Forest Service will continue to confer its annual award for energy efficiency. ARS will continue to use existing employee incentives and awards program of the agency to reward exceptional performance in energy management.

3.3 Green Purchasing Award

USDA will examine the feasibility of establishing an annual internal Green Purchasing Award to agencies and individuals who have been successful in using a multitude of green products.

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Appendix A
Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Green Purchasing Requirements

Federal Acquisition
Regulation(FAR)

Summary

Part 23

States that it is policy to acquire competitively, in a cost-effective manner, products that meet reasonable performance requirements and that are composed of the highest percentage of recovered materials practicable. Part 23 also requires that Federal agencies purchase, where life-cycle cost-effective and available, energy using products that are ENERGY STAR® labeled or meet the requirements of FEMP product energy efficiency recommendations or FEMP low standby power recommendations. Part 23 also states that agencies must maximize the utilization of environmentally preferable products and services.

Part 7

Requires written acquisition plans to discuss all applicable environmental and energy conservation objectives associated with the acquisition.

Part 11

Now requires agencies to consider use of products containing recovered materials, energy efficient products and services, products containing energy-efficient standby power devices, environmentally preferable purchasing criteria developed by the EPA, and environmental objectives when developing, reviewing, or revising specifications, product descriptions, and standards; describing Government requirements for supplies and services; and developing source selection factors.

Requires that for high-speed copier paper, offset paper, forms bond, computer printout paper, carbonless paper, file folders, white wove envelopes, writing and office paper, book paper, cotton fiber paper, and cover stock, the minimum content standard must be no less than 30 percent postconsumer materials.

FAR Clauses Include:

Affirmative Procurement:

  • 52.223-4 Recovered Materials Certification
  • 52.223-9 Estimate of Percentage of Recovered Material Content For EPA Designated Products (Use only on contracts exceeding $100,000)

Recycled Content Paper:

  • 52.204-4 Printed or Copied Double-Sided on Recycled Paper

Support Services and Operations and Maintenance Contractors:

  • 52.223-10 Waste Reduction Program

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Appendix B
Agriculture Acquisition Regulation (AGAR) Green Purchasing Requirements

AGAR

Summary

423.202

Provides information on ENERGY STAR®, energy efficient products, and low standby products and the applicable web site.

423.403

States the policy of USDA to acquire and use EPA designated recycled content products.

423.404

Mandates the Affirmative Procurement Program applicability to USDA agencies and staff offices.

423.404a

Requires that USDA agencies will include in all applicable solicitations and contracts, a preference for products and services which meet or exceed the EPA purchasing guidelines as contained in the EPA product RMANs. Provides that agencies may choose an evaluation factor preference in accord with their agency needs. States that agencies will eliminate virgin material requirements in contract specifications and replace them with a statement of preference for recycled materials.

423.404b

Requires that USDA agencies will actively promote a preference for recovered materials, environmentally preferable products, and biobased products in contracts with vendors, in written materials, and other opportunities.

423.404c

States that agencies will provide in writing reasonable estimates, certification, and verification of recovered material used in the performance of contracts.

423.404d

States that agencies will provide an annual assessment of the effectiveness of their APP actions in increasing the purchase and use of EPA designated products.

423.404e

States waiver provisions for not purchasing EPA designated products.

423.404f

States that purchasing of EPA designated products applies to all purchases, including those at or below the micro-purchase threshold.

423.405

Provides guidance that the APP requirements apply at the individual USDA agency and staff office level.

423.703

States that USDA will support federal green purchasing principles in the acquisition of products and services that are environmentally preferable or that are biobased content products and services. Establishes that USDA agencies will actively promote the preference for environmentally preferable and biobased products in contracts with vendors, in written materials, and other opportunities.

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Appendix C
Sample Section L, Instructions to Offerors

Sample Section L - Instructions to Offerors

This is a sample Section L that incorporates language on the purchasing and use of biobased products. This is provided for informational purposes only. It may be revised to reflect additional or other instructions peculiar to an activity's operation.

In the technical proposal, the offeror shall identify the biobased products to be purchased and used under this contract. For each biobased product, the offeror shall specify the percentage of biobased content, and for the USDA-designated biobased content products, the offeror shall demonstrate that the products to be used under this contract will contain the percentage specified in the USDA recommendations or the highest level of biobased material practicable, consistent with USDA's recommended percentages of biobased content.

The offeror shall document prior experience in specifying, purchasing, using, and installing biobased products. The offeror shall provide a list for all relevant contracts over the past two years involving the specification, purchase, and/or use of biobased products. The offeror shall include a list of the biobased products specified, purchased, used, and installed.

Here is some sample language for Section L:

Item 1: Experience with Cleaning Projects Using Biobased Products

The Government will evaluate the offeror's proposal based on the degree to which the offeror demonstrates the acquisition, installation, and commitment to use biobased products in the performance of cleaning. Offerors possessing past performance experience in the area of cleaning with biobased products will receive greater consideration than others.

Item 2: Use of Biobased Products in Cleaning Projects

The Government will evaluate the degree of the offeror's experience in the use of biobased products in cleaning. Offerors demonstrating the greater quantity and uniqueness in the use of biobased products will receive greater consideration.

Item 3: Project Management Biobased Experience

The Government will evaluate the offeror's past Biobased Project Management Experience in the following areas: Contracts Performed Using Biobased Products, Dollar Amount, and Formal and Informal Communications Methods used to share information and data about biobased products between team members and between organizational entities.

Item 4: Client Satisfaction

The Government will evaluate the offeror's client satisfaction with biobased cleaning products. Offerors demonstrating client satisfaction with an emphasis on "biobased practices" shall receive greater consideration than others.

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Appendix D
Sample Section M, Evaluation Factors for Award

Sample Section M - Evaluation Factors for Award

This is a sample Section M that incorporates evaluation factors that include the offeror's technical and management approach, cost, and past performance associated with biobased products. This is provided for informational purposes only. It may be revised to reflect additional or other factors peculiar to an activity's operation.

The major evaluation factors for this solicitation include technical, management, cost, and past performance. Offerors are advised that award will be made to the offeror whose proposal provides the best overall value to the Government.

The evaluation will be based on the demonstrated capabilities of the prospective Contractors in relation to the requirements of the work.

M.1 Technical Approach 40%

The Government will evaluate the offeror's technical approach for fulfilling the cleaning services, with an emphasis on the following elements:

  1. Identification of all biobased products to be acquired, used, and installed in the performance of the project.
  2. The Offeror's proposed use and installation of biobased products.

M.2 Management Approach 20%

The Government will evaluate the offeror's management plan for fulfilling the requirements. The evaluation will assess the offeror's organizational structure and key personnel to be assigned to perform the project.

M.3 Cost 20%

The Government will evaluate the offeror's cost proposal for the performance of the work. Special emphasis will be placed on the following elements:

  1. Proposed price for the acquisition of biobased products for the project.
  2. Quality of the biobased products for the project.

M.4 Past Performance 20%

The Government will evaluate the offeror's past performance in the successful completion of similar work either for the Government or other clients. The Government will place special emphasis on the Contractor's past performance in the acquisition, use, installation, and commitment to biobased products in the performance of cleaning projects. The Government will evaluate the offeror's client satisfaction with its cleaning practices.

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Appendix E
Contracts Targeted for Insertion of Biobased Language Based on Review of Procurement Forecasts

USDA 2006 Procurement Forecast Contracts Opportunities That Could Include Biobased Components1

Architect Engineering Design Services
100-250K, Q4
Cameron, LA
NRCS
RALPH.BROOME@LA.USDA.GOV

Architect Engineering Services
Small Business
25-100K, Q4
Hilo, HI
RHS
BRINDER.BILLUPS@USDA.GOV

Architect Engineering Services
Small Business
25-100K, Q4
Bozeman, MT
RHS
BRINDER.BILLUPS@USDA.GOV

Architect Engineering Services
Small Business
25-100K, Q4
Montgomery, AL
BRINDER.BILLUPS@USDA.GOV

Barracks Construction
Competition
250-500K, Q4
Las Vegas, NV
FS
ASTOOR@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Building Exterior Repairs
8 (A) Company
$1 million - 5 million, Q4
Madison, WI
FS
SLACINA@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Caulk Windows and Doors
8 (A) Company
Less than 25K, Q4
Fargo, ND
ARS
JANSEND@ARS.USDA.GOV

Construct Complex
Competition
250-500K, Q4
College Station, TX
ARS
MDOWNING@SPA.ARS.USDA.GOV

Construct Greenhouse
Competition
100-250K, Q4
College Station, TX
ARS
MDOWNING@SPA.ARS.USDA.GOV

Construct Greenhouse
8 (A) Company
$1million-5million, Q4
Washington, DC
ARS
JCOOK@ARS.USDA.GOV

Construct Greenhouse
8 (A) Company
$1million-5million, Q4
Oxford, MS
ARS
JCOOK@ARS.USDA.GOV

Construct New Lab
Competition
$1million-5million, Q4
Sidney, MT
ARS
JCOOK@ARS.USDA.GOV

Construct New Research Lab
Competition
$1million-5million, Q4
Aberdeen, ID
ARS
JCOOK@ARS.USDA.GOV

Competition
$1 million-5 million, Q4
Las Vegas, NV
FS
ASTOOR@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Construction Management
8 (A) Company
100-250K, Q4
Ft. Collins, Co
ARS
JCOOK@ARS.USDA.GOV

Construction Management of Center Wing
100-250K, Q4
Peoria, IL
ARS
JCOOK@ARS.USDA.GOV

Construction Management of Greenhouse
250-500K, Q4
Washington, DC
ARS
JCOOK@ARS.USDA.GOV

Construction Management of Greenhouse
100-250K, Q4
Oxford. MS
ARS
JCOOK@ARS.USDA.GOV

Construction Management of Lab
250-500K, Q4
Stoneville, MS
ARS
JCOOK@ARS.USDA.GOV

Construction Management of New Lab
100-250K, Q4
Sidney, MT
ARS
JCOOK@ARS.USDA.GOV

Construction Management of Research Lab
100-250K, Q4
Aberdeen, ID
ARS
JCOOK@ARS.USDA.GOV

Construction Management of Road Reconstruction
250-500K, Q4
Washington, DC
ARS
JCOOK@ARS.USDA.GOV

Construction of Memorial
Competition
250-500K, Q4
Las Vegas, NV
FS
ASTOOR@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Demolition and Destruction
Small Business
25-100K, Q4
El Dorado County, CA
FS
MKJONES@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Facility Modernization and Repair
Competition
250-500K, Q4
Beaver, WV
ARS
RHERCHAK@ARS.USDA.GOV

Fuel Reduction Service
Competition
25-100K, Q4
Ashland, MT
ARS
BPRETTYPAINT@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Janitorial
Competition
25-100K, Q4
Memphis, TN
GIPSA
NORITA.THOMAS@USDA.GOV

Janitorial Maintenance Contract
8 (A) Company
Less than $25K, Q4
Crouch, ID
FS
ASTOOR@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Janitorial Services
GSA/FSS
25-100K, Q4
Alameda, CA
FSIS
DIANE.FURR@USDA.GOV

Janitorial Services
HUB Zone
250-500K, Q4
Madison, WI
FS
SLACINA@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Maintenance of Building
GSA/FSS
25-100K, Q4
Alameda, CA
FSIS
DIANE.FURR@USDA.GOV

Office Renovation
Competition
100-250K, Q4
Roanoke, VA
FS
MSAINTLOUIS@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Office Supplies
GSA/FSS
25-100K, Q4
Columbus, OH
RHS
BRINDER.BILLUPS@USDA.GOV

Office Supplies
GSA/FSS
25-100K, Q4
Raleigh, NC
RHS
BRINDER.BILLUPS@USDA.GOV

Office Supplies
GSA/FSS
25-100K, Q4
Bismarck, ND
RHS
BRINDER.BILLUPS@USDA.GOV

Office Supplies
GSA/FSS
25-100K, Q4
Des Moines, IA
RHS
BRINDER.BILLUPS@USDA.GOV

Office Supplies
GSA/FSS
25-100K, Q4
Lakewood, CO
RHS
BRINDER.BILLUPS@USDA.GOV

Office Supplies
GSA/FSS
25-100K, Q4Athens, GA
RHS
BRINDER.BILLUPS@USDA.GOV

Office Supplies
GSA/FSS
25-100K, Q4
Phoenix, AZ
RHS
BRINDER.BILLUPS@USDA.GOV

Office Supplies
25-100K, Q4
Gainesville, FL
NRCS
LYNN.MERRILL@FL.USDA.GOV

Paint Exterior Bldg
Competition
25-100K, Q4
El Reno, OK
ARS
MDOWNING@SPA.ARS.USDA.GOV

Painting at Units
Small Business
25-100K, Q4
Bend, OR
FS
DDUPERON@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Reconstruct Road
Competition
$1 million - 5 million, Q4
Washington, DC
ARS
JCOOK@ARS.USDA.GOV

Refuse Collection
8 (A) Company
500K-1million, Q4
Beltsville, MD
ARS
DFOLEY@ARS.USDA.GOV

Reconstruct Road
Competition
100-250K, Q4
Hot Springs, AR
FS
SBEARDEN@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Renovate Bldg 2
8 (A) Company
100-250K, Q4
El Reno, OK
ARS
MDOWNING@SPA.ARS.USDA.GOV

Renovate Bldg 10
8(A) Company
250-500K, Q4
El Reno, OK
ARS
MDOWNING@SPA.ARS.USDA.GOV

Renovate Bldg 12
8 (A) Company
500K -1million, Q4
El Reno, OK
ARS
MDOWNING@SPA.ARS.USDA.GOV

Renovate Work Area
Competition
25-100K, Q4
College Station, TX
ARS
MDOWNING@SPA.ARS.USDA.GOV

Repair of Roads
Competition
25-100K, Q4
Sandpoint, ID
FS
CCOOK@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Replace Elevators
Competition
25-100K, Q4
Fort Collins, CO
ARS
JANSEND@ARS.USDA.GOV

Replace Floor Tiles
Competition
100-250K, Q4
College Station, TX
ARS
MDOWNING@SPA.ARS.USDA.GOV

Replace Roofs
Competition
$1 million-5 million, Q4
College Station, TX
ARS
MDOWNING@SPA.ARS.USDA.GOV

Replacement of Flooring
Competition
25-100K, Q4
University Park, PA
ARS
ELEGATES@ARSERRC.GOV

Resurfacing
Competition
25-100K, Q4
Sandpoint, ID
FS
CCOOK@FS.FED.UDSA.GOV

Road Maintenance
Small Business
250-500K, Q4
Corvalis, OR
FS
DDUPERON@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Road Rehab
Competition
250-500K, Q4
Russellville, AR
FS
SBEARDEN@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Road Resurfacing
Competition
25-100K, Q4
Rolling Fork, MS
FS
JODYJONES@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Roofing
Small Business
25-100K, Q4
Bend, OR
FS
DDUPERON@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Trash Contract
Small Business
25-100K, Q4
Talihina, OK
FS
SBEARDEN@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

Trash Removal
GSA/FSS
25-100K, Q4
Alameda, CA
FSIS
DIANE.FURR@USDA.GOV

Various Road Improvements
Small Business
250-500K, Q4
Roseburg, OR
FS
DDUPERON@FS.FED.USDA.GOV

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Appendix F
Sample Template on Custodial Services

Sample Custodial Statement of Work with Biobased Language

This is a sample Statement of Work that incorporates language on the purchasing of biobased products. The Statement of Work is provided for informational purposes. It may be revised to reflect additional or unique tasks peculiar to an activity's custodial operation.

Background

Congress passed a law to encourage the purchase of biobased products: the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act, Section 9002. Federal agencies must purchase designated biobased products and will establish agency preferential procurement programs for such products. Benefits of biobased products are to: enhance the nation's energy security by substituting domestically produced biobased products for fossil fuel based products derived from imported oil and natural gas; improve demands for biobased products to increase demand for agricultural commodities, which are the feedstock of biobased products; spur the development of value added agricultural processing and manufacturing in rural communities, which would create new jobs and income in rural regions; and establish an healthier environment for users.

Supplies, Materials, and Equipment to be Provided by the Contractor

Unless otherwise specified herein, the Contractor shall furnish all supplies, materials, and equipment necessary for the performance of work under this contract. All supplies and materials shall be of a type and quality that conform to applicable Federal specifications and standards... All supplies, materials, and equipment to be used in the performance of work described herein are subject to the approval of the Contracting Officer's Technical Representative (COTR).

The Contractor must submit to the COTR a list of product to be utilized in the performance of its work. The Contractor shall not use any materials, chemicals, or compounds that the COTR determines to be unsuitable to perform the required work. The Contractor shall utilize products and material made from biobased materials (e.g., biobased cleaners, biobased degreasers, biobased laundry detergent) to the maximum extent possible. For the biobased content products evaluation products proposed for use under this contract must conform to the Department of Agriculture (USDA) Designated Biobased Products List (DBPL). If requested in the contract, contractors shall provide data for their biobased solvents and cleaners to document the level of biobased content. Any biobased product that the COTR suspects does not meet USDA specifications or standards shall be tested at the Contractor's expense by an independent laboratory qualified to perform such tests. A copy of the laboratory report of findings shall be submitted to the COTR. These products shall meet the requirements established by applicable Federal specifications and standards or be considered unacceptable for use.

Biobased Products To Be Provided by the Contractor

The following is a list of products USDA requires for custodial purposes. Each product submitted must be identified with one of these categories. It is desirable that vendors be able to supply the greatest number of biobased products listed meeting the health and environmental specifications. Labeling should be printed on all containers.

All Purpose Cleaner

Degreaser/cleaner

Heavy duty cleaner

Deodorizer

Carpet shampoo

Floor finish

Gum Remover

Floor finish restorer

Disinfectant sanitizer

Floor sealer

Extraction fluid

Furniture polish

Floor stripper

Glass cleaner

Neutral cleaner (liquid)

Grout sealer

Spot and stain remover

Lime and scale remover (tub and tile cleaner)

Air freshener including dispenser

Liquid hand soap including dispenser

Bathroom cleaner

Stainless steel polish

Brass polish/cleaner

Toilet bowl cleaner

Chrome polish/cleaner

White board cleaner

Cream cleaner

Wood floor cleaner

Solvent spotter

Laundry detergent

In addition, trash bags shall be used. They must contain at least 25% recycled post consumer content and also be biodegradable material.

The offered products must meet the required content levels as stated in the USDA Final Rule for that designated item. Products which do not meet the mandatory specifications or for which the appropriate information has not been submitted will be disqualified from further consideration.

Required Submittals and Reports

All offerors shall submit with their initial proposal a complete list of products that are to be used in carrying out the requirements of the contract. Additionally, the winning contractor on each anniversary date of the contract shall submit a complete list of products purchased to carryout the contract requirements. The products list shall be organized into the following categories: Designated Biobased products, Non-designated Biobased products, and all other "Green" products (e.g. recycled content products, energy- and water-efficient products, products using renewable energy, and alternatives to hazardous or toxic chemicals). The offeror shall list volume to be used and total cost for each individual product in each category. This information will be used for reporting purposes and to determine the reasonableness of cost.

Once USDA designates a biobased item that is part of the existing contract, the contractor may utilize the remainder of the biobased products that was originally purchased to carryout the requirements of the contract. Once the product has been completely consumed, the contractor shall replace that product with a product that meets the requirements and specifications of the designated Item. The Contracting Officer shall inform the contractor and COTR when an item has been designated. Additionally, the contractor will provide supporting documentation if there is an upward cost impact so that contract pricing can be adjusted accordingly. Likewise, the contract will be adjusted downward if so warranted. To the greatest extent feasible, the Contractor shall also use biobased products.

  1. Cleaning Operations and Stewardship Plan. &The Plan& must be reviewed and updated annually, and as required by the Contracting Officer. The Plan must contain and define the following elements:
    1. The Contractor's written policy stating its commitment to the use of biobased products, employee health and safety, and sound environmental management practices;


    2. Proposed biobased cleaning-products that must be selected in accordance with the criteria included in this Solicitation. At a minimum, the Plan must identify products by brand name for each of the above product types;
    3. NOTE: Contractors may propose more than one product within a designated item and/or propose a product or products addressing more than one designated item

    4. Once this list of products has been approved by the Contracting Officer, the Contractor is responsible for using only those approved cleaning chemical products in the building. If for some reason the product is found later to be ineffective, or the Contractor would otherwise like to propose an alternative product, either the Contractor or Contracting Officer may propose for consideration an "equal" product. The Contracting Officer is the final decision-maker for such substitutions and must approve each in writing;


    5. Product Use and Cleaning Guides which define standard operating procedures for instructing staff in the following areas: the proper use, storage, and disposal of cleaning products; proper cleaning procedures; proper operation of equipment; and other procedures/instructions to accomplish work under this contract; and


    6. The Contractor shall define proper procedures for the storage of hazardous materials in conformance with good housekeeping practices, the National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA) Code, and applicable Federal and municipal regulations. The Plan also must define proper procedures for the identification and disposal of hazardous wastes in accordance with Federal RCRA regulations and the District of Columbia Municipal Regulations (DCMR), Title 20, Subpart E prior to use with personnel.
  2. Affirmative Procurement Program The Contractor must implement the requirements of the agency's comprehensive Affirmative Procurement Program for the purchasing of biobased products to the maximum extent possible. The Contractor shall detail how it intends to keep abreast of the development and increasing availability of biobased products and how any new or improved products will be incorporated on an ongoing basis into contract performance.

Product Demonstration, Employee Training and Technical Assistance

USDA believes that a demonstration of how to use the products, free samples, an effective training program for the products selected, and technical assistance are central to the selection and eventual success of purchasing and using designated biobased products. USDA will look for vendors who will 1) demonstrate their products and leave free samples and 2) when selected, offer effective training to all of our custodial staff and be available with technical assistance to trouble shoot problems.

Quality Control Program

The Contractor shall institute a complete quality-control program to ensure that the products required by this contract are supplied or used, as specified. The overall goal of the program should be to identify and correct any problems that may exist before they are identified by or reported to the COTR and/or the building-management staff. As a minimum, the program shall include:

  1. An inspection system covering all the services required with a comprehensive checklist to be used to inspect contract performance during scheduled and unscheduled inspections, and the name(s) of the individuals who will be performing the inspections.


  2. A system for identifying and correcting deficiencies and/or a pattern of deficiencies in the quality or quantity of services provided before the level of performance becomes unacceptable and/or Government inspectors point out the deficiencies.


  3. A file of all inspections conducted by the Contractor and corrective actions taken. This should include follow-up inspections to ensure that corrective action was appropriate, complete, and timely. This documentation shall be organized in a logical manner, kept current, and made available to the COTR and the Contracting Officer during the term of the contract.

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Appendix G
Sample Template on Vehicle Maintenance

Sample Vehicle Maintenance Statement of Work with Biobased Language

This is a sample Statement of Work that incorporates language on the purchasing of biobased products. The Statement of Work is provided for informational purposes. It may be revised to reflect additional or unique tasks peculiar to an activity's vehicle maintenance operation.

Background.

Congress passed a law to encourage the purchase of biobased products: the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act, Section 9002. Federal agencies must purchase biobased products and will establish agency preferential biobased procurement programs. Benefits of biobased products are: enhance the nation's energy security by substituting domestically produced biobased products for fossil fuel based products derived from imported oil and natural gas; improve demands for biobased products to increase demand for agricultural commodities, which are the feedstock of biobased products; spur the development of value added agricultural processing and manufacturing in rural communities, which would create new jobs and income in rural regions; and establish an healthier environment for users.

1.0 Scope of Work.

Unless otherwise specified herein, the contractor shall provide all supplies, personnel, equipment, tools, materials, supervision, and other items or services necessary to perform the management and operation of motor vehicle maintenance functions as defined in this Performance Work Statement (PWS). All supplies and materials shall be of a type and quality that conform to applicable Federal specifications and standards and, to the extent feasible and reasonable, include the exclusive use of biobased products. All supplies, materials, and equipment to be used in the performance of work described herein are subject to the approval of the Contracting Officer Representative (COTR).

1.2 The contractor must submit to the COTR a list indicating the name of the manufacturer, the brand name, and the intended use of each of the materials, proposed for use in the performance of its work.

1.3 The contractor shall not use any materials, chemicals, or compounds which the COTR determines would be unsuitable for the intended purpose or harmful to the surfaces to which applied.

1.4 The contractor shall utilize products and material made from biobased materials (e.g., biobased lubricants, biobased hydraulic fluids, biobased fuel additives) to the maximum extent possible without jeopardizing the intended end use or detracting from the overall quality delivered to the end user.

1.5 For the biobased content products evaluation, all products proposed for use under this contract must conform to the Department of Agriculture (USDA) Designated Biobased Products List (DBPL) whenever practicable. Contractors should provide data for their biobased lubricants and hydraulic fluids to document biobased content, and source of biobased material (i.e. particular crop or livestock). Any material which the COTR suspects does not meet Federal specifications or standards shall be tested at the Contractor's expense by an independent testing laboratory qualified to perform such tests as are required. A copy of the laboratory report giving the results of the test and a sample of each product, if requested, shall be submitted to the COTR. These products shall meet the requirements established by applicable Federal specifications and standards or be considered unacceptable for use.

1.6 The following is a list of products USDA requires for vehicle maintenance purposes. Each product submitted must be identified with one of these categories. It is desirable that vendors be able to supply the greatest number of biobased products listed meeting the health and environmental specifications. Labeling should be printed on all containers.

Hydraulic fluids
Diesel fuel additives
General penetrants and lubricants
Bar and chain oil
Hydraulic lubricants
Lube chain lubricants
Biobased gas conditioners
Chain bar lubricants
Fuel conditioners

Penetrating lubricants
Multipurpose lubricants
Transmission fluids
Degreasers
Air tool lubricants
Chrome polish/cleaners
Glass cleaners
All purpose cleaners

The offered products must meet the required consistencies as stated in the USDA Final Rule. Products which do not meet the mandatory specifications or for which the appropriate information has not been submitted will be disqualified from further consideration.

1.7 The contractor shall provide intermediate maintenance, preventive maintenance and scheduled inspections/tests; repair/replace unserviceable parts, assemblies, subassemblies and components; refinish, fabricate parts, make modifications; repair accessories and auxiliary equipment, and body and structural repair.

1.8 The contractor shall provide on-call response within 60 minutes for weekends, holidays, and after normal duty hours for emergency vehicle repair. This work shall be continuous 24 hours a day, 7 days a week until completed, unless approved by the COTR.

1.9 Not later than 30 days prior to contract start date, the contractor shall establish procedures to ensure on call personnel shall report for duty within 60 minutes of notification. The contractor shall furnish the USDA personnel an on call contact listing. This listing shall be updated to ensure personnel are available continuously throughout the contract period.

1.10 The contractor shall maintain all vehicles to the standards contained in USDA mandatory directives and manuals.

1.11 The contractor shall accomplish scheduled preventive maintenance, concurrent and special inspections, tests, and calibration.

1.12 The contractor shall be responsible for installation or transfer of vehicle accessories and special equipment as approved by the COTR. The contractor shall be responsible for repairs and parts after installation.

1.13 The contractor shall clean and service all vehicles, after performing maintenance repairs.

1.14 The contractor shall be responsible for accomplishing minor repairs estimated at two labor hours or less. Work Orders shall be used to document minor maintenance. Minor maintenance repairs shall begin NLT 15 minutes after receipt of vehicle for maintenance.

1.15 The contractor shall provide, issue, and add all replenishment fluids/ lubricants to Include; engine oils, transmission, brake and hydraulic fluids, gear lubricants, and coolants that meet the standards set forth in USDA directives and manuals.

1.16 The contractor shall provide on-site maintenance for vehicles and equipment which because of their design or immobility cannot economically be delivered to the vehicle maintenance facility. The contractor shall develop a list of these assets, by registration number, keep the list current, and provide the COTR a copy within 10 days after contract awarded and update changes as they occur.

1.17 The contractor shall provide unscheduled mobile maintenance to start or repair vehicles and equipment that are disabled. This service shall be provided ASAP, but dispatch shall occur NLT 15 minutes, after notification of the requirement. The contractor shall utilize a service call log. The log shall be provided to the COTR upon request.

1.18 The contractor shall provide repair and replacement of vehicle and equipment tires IAW USDA directives and manuals. Disposal of unserviceable tires shall be the contractor's responsibility IAW approved environmental procedures. Unserviceable tires shall be removed weekly.

1.19 The contractor shall maintain strict control of all accountable documents. This includes logs and registers required by USDA.

1.20 The contractor shall ensure that a Vehicle Maintenance Manager is responsible for the development and execution of a comprehensive base wide vehicle maintenance program. Program includes planning utilization of resources, managing facilities and equipment, analyzing operational problems and taking corrective action, and providing technical and administrative advice to vehicle/equipment using organizations. Determines/resolves technical matters/problems involved in the repair and maintenance of vehicles and equipment. Prepares and defines budgets for the operation of the vehicle maintenance program.

1.21 The contractor shall furnish in writing to the COTR the names of all contractor personnel not later than (NLT) the contract pre-performance conference. The COTR shall immediately be notified in writing whenever changes are made.

1.22 The contractor shall comply with Federal drug-free workplace and work force requirements IAW the Federal Acquisition Regulations.

1.23 Some classifications of work may require special protective clothing; coveralls, aprons, masks, face shields, reflective vests, back supports, gloves, and steel-toed safety shoes/boots IAW the regulations covering the job descriptions. The contractor shall be responsible for identifying those job classifications requiring protection equipment IAW OSHA standards.

1.24 The contractor shall insure that employees have the following current and valid professional certifications before operating Government vehicles. Vehicle Operators must have a valid State driver's license. All contractor employees operating Government vehicles must maintain a current commercial driver's license for the commercial type of vehicle being operated. To operate vehicles carrying hazardous material drivers would be required to have a Hazardous material endorsement.

1.25 The contractor shall provide motor vehicle and equipment repair parts equal to or that exceeds the quality of replacement parts supplied by the original equipment manufacturer.

1.26 Commercially purchased or contractor rebuilt parts may be used if they equal or exceed the quality of the original parts.

2.0 Required Submittals and Reports.

2.1 Within thirty (30) days of contract award, the Contractor shall submit a Vehicle Maintenance Plan ("Plan"). This submittal shall be approved by the Contracting Officer in writing. The Contractor shall not commence work until this submittal is approved by the Contracting Officer in writing. The Contractor is responsible for making such revisions to the plan as are deemed necessary by the Contracting Officer. If the Plan requires any revisions or corrections, the Contractor shall resubmit the Plan within ten (10) days. No work will be allowed and no progress payments will be processed until the Plan is approved.

2.2 The Plan must be reviewed and updated annually, and as required by the Contracting Officer. The Plan must contain and define the following elements:

2.2.1 The Contractor's written policy stating its commitment to the use of biobased products, employee health and safety, and sound environmental management practices.

2.2.2 Proposed biobased vehicle maintenance products which must be selected in accordance with the criteria included in this Solicitation. At a minimum, the Plan must identify products by brand name for each of the above product types.

NOTE: Contractors may propose more than one product within a product category and/or propose a product or products addressing more than one product category.

2.2.3 The product attributes for the proposed product brands in each of the above categories must be summarized. Once this list of products has been approved by the Contracting Officer, the Contractor is responsible for using only those approved products. If for some reason the product is found later to be ineffective, or the Contractor would otherwise like to propose an alternative product, either the Contractor or Contracting Officer may propose for consideration an "equal" product. The Contracting Officer is the final decision-maker for such substitutions and must approve each in writing;

2.2.4 Product Guides which define standard operating procedures for instructing staff in the proper use, storage, and disposal of biobased products; proper maintenance of equipment; and other procedures/instructions to accomplish work under this contract;

2.2.5 The contractor shall define proper procedures for the storage of hazardous materials in conformance with good housekeeping practices, the National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA) Code, and applicable Federal and municipal regulations. The Plan also must define proper procedures for the identification and disposal of hazardous wastes in accordance with Federal RCRA regulations.

2.2.6 The Contractor must implement a comprehensive Affirmative Procurement Program for the purchasing of biobased, products and products made with recovered materials to the maximum extent possible. The Contractor shall detail how it intends to keep abreast of the development and increasing availability of biobased products and how any new or improved products will be incorporated on an ongoing basis into contract performance. The Contract will also indicate how, at a minimum, it will conform to the Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines (CPG) published by EPA with respect to recovered material products. The Contractor must update its Program to accommodate all revisions.

2.2.7 The contractor shall provide data on the quantity and dollar values of biobased products and recycled content products used in this contract. The data will be submitted to the COTR monthly.

3.0 Product Demonstration, Employee Training and Technical Assistance.

USDA believes that a demonstration of how to use the products, free samples, an effective training program for the products selected, and technical assistance are central to the selection and eventual success of purchasing and using biobased products.

3.1 USDA will look for vendors who will 1) demonstrate their products and leave free samples and 2) when selected, offer effective training to all of the vehicle maintenance staff and be available with technical assistance to trouble shoot problems.

4.0 Quality Control Program.

4.1 The contractor shall institute and maintain a complete quality-control program to ensure that the requirements of this contract are provided, as specified. The overall goal of the program should be to identify and correct any problems that may exist before they are identified by or reported to the COTR and/or the vehicle maintenance staff. As a minimum, the program shall include:

4.1.1 An inspection system covering all the services required with a comprehensive checklist to be used to inspect contract performance during scheduled and unscheduled inspections, and the name(s) of the individuals who will be performing the inspections.

4.1.2 A system for identifying and correcting deficiencies and/or a pattern of deficiencies in the quality or quantity of services provided before the level of performance becomes unacceptable and/or Government inspectors point out the deficiencies.

4.1.3 A file of all inspections conducted by the Contractor and corrective actions taken. This should include follow-up inspections to ensure that corrective action was appropriate, complete, and timely. This documentation shall be organized in a logical manner, kept current, and made available to the COTR and the Contracting Officer during the term of the contract.

4.2. The contractor shall establish and implement key control procedures in the Quality Control Plan to ensure keys issued to the contractor by the Government are properly safeguarded and not used by unauthorized personnel. The contractor shall not duplicate keys issued by the Government.

5.0 Quality Assurance.

5.1 The Government shall evaluate the contractor's performance under this contract. All surveillance observations shall be recorded by the Government. When an observation indicates defective performance, the COTR shall request the contractor's representative to initial the observation. All observations of incomplete or defective performance, or safety and health standards violated shall be recorded. Written notices issued by the CO shall require the contractor to reply, in writing, to the CO within five workdays after receipt, explaining reasons for the existing conditions, the corrective action, and procedures taken to prevent recurrence.

5.2 Government verification inspections of services shall not constitute acceptance, nor replace the contractor inspection or in any way relieve the contractor of any responsibility to take all actions necessary to assure highest quality of service rendered.

5.3 The contractor may be required to meet at least weekly with the COTR during the first month of the contract. Meetings shall be as often as necessary thereafter as determined by the COTR.

5.4. The contractor shall maintain a current listing of employees. The list shall include employee's name, social security number, and level of security clearance. The list shall be validated and signed by the Contractor and provided to the COTR. Updated listings shall be provided when an employee's status or information changes.

6.0. Operating Hours.

6.1. Operating hours shall meet mission requirements.

6.2. Vehicle Maintenance normal hours of operation shall be continuously from 0630 to 1530 hours daily, Monday through Friday.

6.3. Recognized Holidays. Except for work categorized as emergency, the contractor is not required to provide all services on the Federal holidays.

NOTE: Any of the above holidays falling on a Saturday or Sunday shall be observed on the date designated by the Federal Government.

6.4. Upon notification by the COTR, the contractor shall provide services to support weekend/holiday training schedule.

7.0 Safety and Accident Prevention.

7.1. The contractor shall formulate and submit, within 30 days after the conditional contract award date, a written safety and health plan for acceptance by the Government. The written plan shall include the details of the contractor's safety organization, responsibilities, method of program implementation, and how hazards and deficiencies shall be identified and corrected. It shall detail employee's responsibilities for: protection of Government property and safety of others, employee's responsibilities for reporting all mishaps, and establish procedures for reporting or correcting unsafe conditions, hazards, or practices. The plan shall also contain mishap notification and reporting procedures. The contractor shall have a central POC for safety and health related issues. The POC shall be identified in writing to the COTR.

7.2. The contractor shall ensure employees have safety education when engaged in activities involving Government facilities, personnel, or equipment.

7.3. The contractor shall immediately notify USDA safety personnel of all accidents/incidents involving employee use of and/or damage/injury to facilities, equipment, or personnel.

7.4. The contractor shall require their personnel to wear safety shoes/boots IAW OSHA standards.

7.5. The contractor shall provide all required personal protection equipment, e.g. respirators, hearing protection, eye protection, gloves, steel-toed boots, aprons, masks, face shields, reflective vests, etc. IAW OSHA standards.

8.0. Environmental Requirements.

8.1. The contractor shall comply with all Federal, state, and local environmental laws, and USDA policies and regulations to include but not limited to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Safe Water Drinking Act (SWDA), the Clean Air Act (CAA), and Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA).

8.2. The use, handling, storage, and disposal of all toxic, hazardous, special or radiological wastes/materials shall be IAW all local, state, Federal, and USDA environmental regulations and procedures. Personnel shall be trained by the Government on proper procedures to include spill response and clean up.

8.3. The contractor shall provide a complete environmental plan to assure compliance with all environmental statutes and regulations. One copy of the plan shall be provided to the COTR at the pre-performance conference and as changes occur.

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Appendix H
Sample Template on Maintenance and Repair

Sample Maintenance and Repair Statement of Work with Biobased Language

This is a sample Statement of Work that incorporates language on the purchasing of biobased products. The Statement of Work is provided for informational purposes. It may be revised to reflect additional or unique tasks peculiar to an activity's maintenance and repair operation.

Background

Congress passed a law to encourage the purchase of biobased products: the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act, Section 9002. Federal agencies must purchase biobased products and will establish agency preferential biobased procurement programs. Benefits of biobased products are: enhance the nation's energy security by substituting domestically produced biobased products for fossil fuel based products derived from imported oil and natural gas; improve demands for biobased products to increase demand for agricultural commodities, which are the feedstock of biobased products; spur the development of value added agricultural processing and manufacturing in rural communities, which would create new jobs and income in rural regions; and establish an healthier environment for users.

1.0 Scope of Work

1.1 Unless otherwise specified herein, the contractor shall provide all supplies, personnel, equipment, tools, materials, supervision, and other items or services necessary for the maintenance and repair of buildings and structures and related systems and equipment as defined in the PWS.

1.2. Maintenance and repair services shall include but not be limited to the following:

Carpentry and Masonry - floors, tiles, carpet, baseboards, walls, ceilings, trim, doors, stairs, shades, cabinets, shutters, molding, roofing, gutters, sidewalks, patios, windows, screens, and signs.

Painting - touch-up paining.

Plumbing - water heaters, sinks toilets, urinals, faucets, showers, and drinking fountains.

Electrical - service connections, panels, outlets, switches, circuits, lighting fixtures, faceplates, receptacles, light bulbs, lamps, and appliances.

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning - heating equipment, air conditioning equipment, refrigeration equipment, blowers, compressors, motors, dampers, condensers, cooling coils, pumps, duct work, air filters, heating units, and air conditioning units.

1.3 All supplies and materials shall be of a type and quality that conform to applicable Federal specifications and standards and, to the extent feasible and reasonable, include the exclusive use of biobased products. All supplies, materials, and equipment to be used in the performance of work described herein are subject to the approval of the COTR.

1.4 The contractor must submit to the COTR a list indicating the name of the manufacturer, the brand name, and the intended use of each of the materials, proposed for use in the performance of its work.

1.5 The contractor shall not use any materials, chemicals, or compounds which the COTR determines would be unsuitable for the intended purpose or harmful to the surfaces to which applied.

1.6 The contractor shall utilize products and material made from biobased materials (e.g., biobased floor stripper, biobased carpet, biobased insulation) to the maximum extent possible without jeopardizing the intended end use or detracting from the overall quality delivered to the end user.

1.7 For the biobased content products evaluation, all products proposed for use under this contract must conform to the Department of Agriculture (USDA) Designated Biobased Products List (DBPL) whenever practicable. Contractors should provide data for their biobased solvents and cleaners to document biobased content, and source of biobased material (i.e. particular crop or livestock). Any material which the COTR suspects does not meet Federal specifications or standards shall be tested at the Contractor's expense by an independent testing laboratory qualified to perform such tests as are required. A copy of the laboratory report giving the results of the test and a sample of each product, if requested, shall be submitted to the COTR. These products shall meet the requirements established by applicable Federal specifications and standards or be considered unacceptable for use.

1.8 The following is a list of products USDA requires for maintenance and repair purposes. Each product submitted must be identified with one of these categories. It is desirable that vendors be able to supply the greatest number of biobased products listed meeting the health and environmental specifications. Labeling should be printed on all containers.

Urethane Roof Coatings

Stain Removers

Adhesive and Mastic Removers

Insulation

Water Tank Coatings

Greases

Bio-fluid Filled Transformers

Paint Stripper

Carpet Shampoo

Carpet

Floor Finish

Degreasers

All Purpose Cleaners

Floor Finish Restorer

Penetrates and Lubricants

Extraction Fluid

Composite Panels

Hydraulic Fluids

Floor Stripper

Penetrating Lubricants

Wood Floor Cleaner

Glass Cleaners

Insulating Foams

Solvent Spotter

Metal Working Fluids

Sealers (wood, concrete)

 

Grease and Graffiti Removers

Sorbents

 

The offered products must meet the required consistencies as stated in the USDA Final Rule. Products which do not meet the mandatory specifications or for which the appropriate information has not been submitted will be disqualified from further consideration.

1.9 The contractor shall perform service call work, recurring work, and preventive maintenance. The contractor shall plan and schedule work to assure material, labor, and equipment are available to complete work requirements with regard to established time limits and quality standards. Verbal scheduling and status reports shall be provided when requested by the COTR.

1.10 The contractor shall receive all service call requests directly from building occupants and other authorized Government representatives. Calls shall be classified by the contractor as emergency, urgent, or routine. The contractor shall respond accordingly for emergency and urgent calls. A log shall be maintained of all service calls received; a description of the problem or requested work, date and time received facility/building name and number, ands caller's name/telephone number shall be recorded for each call. The contractor shall plan and schedule work to assure material, labor, and equipment are available to complete work requirements with regard to established time limits and quality standards. Verbal scheduling and status reports shall be provided when requested by the COTR.

1.11 Emergency service calls will be classified as emergency at the discretion of the COTR. Generally, emergency calls consist of correcting failures that constitute an immediate danger to personnel; threaten to damage property, or threaten to disrupt activity operations. Urgent service calls will be classified as urgent at the discretion of the COTR. Generally, urgent calls consist of providing services or correcting failures which do not immediately threaten personnel, property, or activity missions, but will soon inconvenience and/or affect the health or well being of personnel, lead to property damage. Routine service calls will be classified as routine when the work does not qualify as an emergency or urgent call.

1.12 The contractor shall have procedures for receiving and responding to emergency service within the specified response time seven days a week, including weekends and holidays and provide on-call response within 30 minutes for weekends, holidays, and after normal duty hours for emergency service calls. This work shall be continuous 24 hours a day, 7 days a week until completed, unless approved by the COTR. The contractor must be on the job site and working within 60 minutes after receipt of an emergency service call. The contractor shall work without interruption and shall correct, remedy, or take other action as required to contain the emergency service call before departing the job site.

1.13 The Contractor shall have procedures for receiving and responding to urgent service calls within one hour after receipt of an urgent service call received during regular working hours, and within 2 hours for urgent calls received after regular working hours, on weekends, or holidays.

1.14 All routine service calls shall be completed within 3 working days after receipt. Routine calls shall be normally accomplished during regular working hours, Monday through Friday.

1.15 Recurring work includes preventive maintenance (PM) and start-up/shutdown of systems. The contractor shall maintain sufficient parts, materials, and equipment on hand to perform all recurring work as specified. Preventive maintenance consists primarily of inspection, lubrication, calibration, adjustment, and minor part and component replacement (e.g., filter, belts, fluids, oil, and grease) as required to minimize malfunction, breakdown, and deterioration of equipment; and the identification of and/or performance of any repairs required to ensure the equipment is operating per manufacturer's standards. The contractor shall complete all identified repairs and provide all necessary services, parts, and materials as part of the PM.

1.16 The Contractor shall submit a detailed PM schedule to the COTR for approval at least 15 calendar days prior to the start date of the contract. The schedule shall cover the entire term of the contract and include for each system/piece of equipment and PM lasted herein, the facility/building number, the work to be performed (e.g., semiannual PM), and the week of the month the PM will be perfumed.

1.17 The contractor shall arrange work so as not to cause interference with normal occurrence of Government business. In those cases where some interference is unavoidable, the Contractor must make every effort to minimize the impact of the interference and its effects.

1.18 Other contractors may be engaged in work in support of the facilities/buildings. The Contractor for this contract shall coordinate and cooperate with all other Contractors to avoid conflicts in work schedules and performance. In the event of conflicts that cannot be satisfactorily resolved, the matter shall be referred to the Contracting Officer for a decision.

1.19 The contractor shall furnish in writing to the COTR the names of all contractor personnel not later than (NLT) the contract pre-performance conference. The COTR shall immediately be notified in writing whenever changes are made.

1.20 The contractor shall comply with Federal drug-free workplace and work force requirements IAW the Federal Acquisition Regulations.

1.21 The contractor personnel shall present a neat appearance and be easily recognized. Waivers or exceptions for office personnel must be accepted by the COTR.

1.22 Some classifications of work may require special protective clothing; coveralls, aprons, masks, face shields, reflective vests, back supports, gloves, and steel-toed safety shoes/boots IAW the regulations covering the job descriptions. The contractor shall be responsible for identifying those job classifications requiring protection equipment IAW OSHA standards.

1.23 The contractor shall insure that employees have the following current and valid professional certifications before operating Government vehicles. Vehicle Operations drivers must be commercially licensed by the appropriate State to operate vehicles used in the performance of this contract on Federal, state, and local highway systems. Vehicle Maintenance technicians must possess a current USDA Motor Vehicle Operator Identification Card for the type vehicle/equipment that shall be operated prior to operating vehicles. All contractor employees operating Government vehicles must maintain a current commercial driver's license for the type vehicle being operated. Hazardous material endorsement shall be required by drivers to operate vehicles carrying hazardous material on and off base. Government vehicles shall not be utilized by contractor personnel to acquire commercial drivers' license or for any type of training. This licensing requirement is the responsibility of the contractor and shall be done at no cost to the Government.

2.0 Required Submittals and Reports

2.1 The Contractor shall maintain management, operation, and maintenance records and prepare management, operation, and maintenance reports. Within thirty (30) days of contract award, the Contractor shall establish a separate history file for each facility/building. Each file shall contain a listing of all equipment by nomenclature and manufacturer's model number, as well as all manufacturer's literature, brochures, and pamphlets; maintenance, operator, and parts list manuals; warranty information; a copy of all completed Service Call Work Forms; Preventive Maintenance inspection checklists and forms; and any other information relevant to work performed during the term of the contract. Facility/building files shall be made available for review when requested by the COTR, and turned over to the Contracting Officer within five calendar days after contract completion.

2.2 The Contractor shall develop a Maintenance and Repair Plan that will be reviewed and updated annually, and as required by the Contracting Officer. The Plan must contain and define the following elements:

2.2.1 The Contractor's written policy stating its commitment to the use of biobased products, employee health and safety, and sound environmental management practices.

2.2.2 Proposed biobased vehicle maintenance products which must be selected in accordance with the criteria included in this Solicitation. At a minimum, the Plan must identify products by brand name for each of the above product types.

NOTE: Contractors may propose more than one product within a product category and/or propose a product or products addressing more than one product category.

2.2.3 The product attributes for the proposed product brands in each of the above categories must be summarized. Once this list of products has been approved by the Contracting Officer, the Contractor is responsible for using only those approved products. If for some reason the product is found later to be ineffective, or the Contractor would otherwise like to propose an alternative product, either the Contractor or Contracting Officer may propose for consideration an "equal" product. The Contracting Officer is the final decision-maker for such substitutions and must approve each in writing;

2.2.4 Product Guides which define standard operating procedures for instructing staff in the proper use, storage, and disposal of biobased products; proper maintenance of equipment; and other procedures/instructions to accomplish work under this contract;

2.2.5 The contractor shall define proper procedures for the storage of hazardous materials in conformance with good housekeeping practices, the National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA) Code, and applicable Federal and municipal regulations. The Plan also must define proper procedures for the identification and disposal of hazardous wastes in accordance with Federal RCRA regulations and the District of Columbia Municipal Regulations (DCMR), Title 20, Subpart E. prior to use with personnel.

2.2.6 The Contractor must implement a comprehensive Affirmative Procurement Program for the purchasing of biobased, products and products made with recovered materials to the maximum extent possible. The Contractor shall detail how it intends to keep abreast of the development and increasing availability of biobased products and how any new or improved products will be incorporated on an ongoing basis into contract performance. The Contract will also indicate how, at a minimum, it will conform to the Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines (CPG) published by EPA with respect to recovered material products. The Contractor must update its Program to accommodate all revisions.

2.2.7 The contractor shall provide data on the quantity and dollar values of biobased products and recycled content products used in this contract. The data will be submitted to the COTR monthly.

2.2.8 The contractor shall maintain strict control of all documents. This includes logs and registers required by the Department of Agriculture.

3.0 Product Demonstration, Employee Training and Technical Assistance

USDA believes that a demonstration of how to use the products, free samples, an effective training program for the products selected, and technical assistance are central to the selection and eventual success of purchasing and using biobased products.

3.1 USDA will look for vendors who will 1) demonstrate their products and leave free samples and 2) when selected, offer effective training to all of our vehicle maintenance staff and be available with technical assistance to trouble shoot problems.

4.0 Quality Control Program

4.1 The contractor shall institute and maintain a complete quality-control program to ensure that the requirements of this contract are provided, as specified. The overall goal of the program should be to identify and correct any problems that may exist before they are identified by or reported to the COTR and/or the building-management staff.

As a minimum, the program shall include:

4.1.1 An inspection system covering all the services required with a comprehensive checklist to be used to inspect contract performance during scheduled and unscheduled inspections, and the name(s) of the individuals who will be performing the inspections.

4.1.2 A system for identifying and correcting deficiencies and/or a pattern of deficiencies in the quality or quantity of services provided before the level of performance becomes unacceptable and/or Government inspectors point out the deficiencies.

4.1.3 A file of all inspections conducted by the Contractor and corrective actions taken. This should include follow-up inspections to ensure that corrective action was appropriate, complete, and timely. This documentation shall be organized in a logical manner, kept current, and made available to the COTR and the Contracting Officer during the term of the contract.

4.2. Not later than 30 days prior to contract start date, the contractor shall establish procedures to ensure on call personnel shall report for duty within 60 minutes of notification. The contractor shall furnish the USDA personnel an on call contact listing. This listing shall be updated to ensure personnel are available continuously throughout the contract period.

5.0 Quality Assurance

5.1 The Government shall evaluate the contractor's performance under this contract. All surveillance observations shall be recorded by the Government. When an observation indicates defective performance, the COTR shall request the contractor's representative initial the observation.

5.2 Government verification inspections of services shall not constitute acceptance, nor replace the contractor inspection or in any way relieve the contractor of any responsibility to take all actions necessary to assure highest quality of service rendered.

5.3 The contractor may be required to meet at least weekly with the COTR during the first month of the contract. Meetings shall be as often as necessary thereafter as determined by the COTR.

5.4. The contractor shall maintain a current listing of employees. The list shall include employee's name, social security number, and level of security clearance. The list shall be validated and signed by the Contractor and provided to the COTR. Updated listings shall be provided when an employee's status or information changes.

6.0. Operating Hours.

6.1 Operating hours shall meet mission requirements.

6.2. Maintenance normal hours of operation shall be continuously from 0630 to 1530 hours daily, Monday through Friday

6.3. Recognized Holidays. Except for work categorized as emergency, the contractor is not required to provide all services on the Federal holidays

NOTE: Any of the above holidays falling on a Saturday or Sunday shall be observed on the date designated by the Federal Government.

6.4 Upon notification by the COTR, the contractor shall provide services to support weekend/holiday training schedule.

7.0 Safety and Accident Prevention.

7.1. The contractor shall formulate and submit, within 30 days after the conditional contract award date, a written safety and health plan for acceptance by the Government. The written plan shall include the details of the contractor's safety organization, responsibilities, method of program implementation, and how hazards and deficiencies shall be identified and corrected. It shall detail employee's responsibilities for: protection of Government property and safety of others, employee's responsibilities for reporting all mishaps, and establish procedures for reporting or correcting unsafe conditions, hazards, or practices. The plan shall also contain mishap notification and reporting procedures. The contractor shall have a central POC for safety and health related issues. The POC shall be identified in writing to the COTR.

7.2. The contractor shall ensure employees have safety education when engaged in activities involving Government facilities, personnel, or equipment.

7.3 The contractor shall immediately notify USDA safety personnel of all accidents/incidents involving employee use of and/or damage/injury to facilities, equipment, or personnel.

7.4 The contractor shall require their personnel to wear safety shoes/boots IAW OSHA standards.

7.5 The contractor shall provide all required personal protection equipment, e.g. respirators, hearing protection, eye protection, gloves, steel-toed boots, aprons, masks, face shields, reflective vests, etc. IAW OSHA standards.

8.0. Environmental Requirements.

8.1 The contractor shall comply with all Federal, state, and local environmental laws, and USDA policies and regulations to include but not limited to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Safe Water Drinking Act (SWDA), the Clean Air Act (CAA), and Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA).

8.2 The use, handling, storage, and disposal of all toxic, hazardous, special or radiological wastes/materials shall be IAW all local, state, Federal, and USDA environmental regulations and procedures. Personnel shall be trained by the Government on proper procedures to include spill response and clean up.

8.3 The contractor shall provide a complete environmental plan to assure compliance with all environmental statutes and regulations. One copy of the plan shall be provided to the COTR at the pre-performance conference and as changes occur.

9.0 Government Observations.

9.1 The COTR shall be responsible for continuous observations of the contractor's performance under this contract. All observations of incomplete or defective performance, or safety and health standards violated shall be recorded. Written notices issued by the CO shall require the contractor to reply, in writing, to the CO within five workdays after receipt, explaining reasons for the existing conditions, the corrective action, and procedures taken to prevent recurrence.

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Appendix I
AGAR Advisory on FedBizOps Solicitation Descriptions

May 23, 2006

AGAR ADVISORY

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
PROCUREMENT POLICY DIVISION
AGAR ADVISORY NO. 82

Requisite Language for Federal Business Opportunities (FedBizOpps) Solicitation Descriptions When Designated Biobased Items are Included as Part of a USDA Contract Requirement

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this Agriculture Acquisition Regulation (AGAR) Advisory is to 1) standardize FedBizOpps synopsis language for USDA contract requirements that contain biobased products and 2) improve a business' ability to identify USDA contract requirements that contain biobased product requirements through a FedBizOpps synopsis.

SUMMARY:

Section 9002 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (FSRIA), 7 U.S.C. 8102, charges the Department of Agriculture (USDA) with the development and implementation of a comprehensive affirmative procurement program (APP) to increase the procurement and use of biobased products. USDA's APP is available at http://www.usda.gov/procurement/biobased/APP.pdf.

Biobased products are commercial or industrial products that are composed in whole, or in significant part, of biological products or renewable domestic agricultural materials or forestry materials. Over 150 categories (Items) of biobased products have been identified for designation by the Secretary. A detailed description of each Item category can be found at http://www.biobased.oce.usda.gov/public/categories.cfm.

The biobased procurement program to increase the procurement and use of biobased products is an important issue to USDA leadership. The importance and impact of the program to USDA's customers is considerable. Its success will stimulate new markets and help create new investment, job formation, and income generation in rural America.

OBJECTIVE:

To increase the purchase and use of biobased products at USDA

Strategies to meet the objective include:

  1. Promote biobased product awareness and requirements to USDA staff at all levels and to other Federal users;


  2. Ensure that potential vendors are able to easily identify those USDA solicitations that contain biobased product requirements; and


  3. Ensure designated biobased products receive a preference for inclusion as requirements in appropriate USDA contracts over the simplified acquisition threshold.

ACTION:

Program officials are responsible for identifying the contract needs of their respective organizations. Where possible, they should consider including biobased products to replace non-biobased products for a specific contract requirement. When developing the statement of work (SOW) for a contract requirement that contains biobased products, program personnel should conduct a market research to determine availability and cost of the identified biobased products. Once the SOW has been completed, it shall be forwarded to their cognizant contracting office serving their organization.

The contracting officer (CO) shall ensure, when biobased products have been included in a contract requirement, that the following two sentences are incorporated into the Synopsis description submitted to the Federal Business Opportunities (FedBizOpps): "This procurement requires the use of biobased products to the extent that such products are reasonably available, meet agency or relevant industry performance standards, and are reasonably priced. Where available, these products should first be acquired from among qualified products that fall under the umbrella of items designated through the Federal Biobased Products Preferred Procurement Program (FB4P)".

EFFECTIVE DATE

The provisions of this Advisory are effective immediately.

If you have any questions or comments regarding this advisory, please contact Mike Green by phone at (202) 720-7217, fax at (202) 720-8972, or by e-mail at Mike.Green@usda.gov

EXPIRATION DATE: Effective until canceled.

[END]

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Appendix J
Deputy Secretary's Memorandum on Energy and Fuel Conservation Actions

Appendix J memo

Appendix J memo

Appendix J memo

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Appendix K
Buy Biobased Brochure

Appendix K Brochure

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Appendix L
Green Purchasing Success Stories

For Immediate Release

 

Contact Mike Green

USDA, Washington, D.C.
June 1, 2004

202-720-7921

Biobased Procurement Program Adopted by
Agricultural Research Service (ARS)

The Southern Plains Area of the ARS has become an early adopter of the Biobased Procurement Program and is taking immediate steps to ensure awareness, participation, and integration.

The Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (FSRIA), Section 9002 of Public Law 107-17, mandates the development of a Federal Biobased Products Preferred Procurement Program (FB4P) that requires Federal agencies to purchase biobased products. Products classified as biobased are those commercial and industrial non-food products composed, in whole or significant part, of biological and/or renewable domestic agricultural or forestry materials, such as plant, animal, and marine.

USDA's Secretary Ann M. Veneman says the FB4P, "builds upon President Bush's commitment to promoting energy independence while protecting the environment. This program will improve environmental health by using renewable resources from our farms and forests to produce products, [many which have previously been] derived from fossil energy sources. This program will enhance the development of high performing and environmentally friendly products."

Implementation of the FB4P by the Southern Plains Area of the ARS is multi-faceted and serves as a potential model. Area Director C.A. Onstad in College Station, Texas promoted the program in his four-state region by sending a detailed memorandum along with a video of the highly successful biobased efforts at the Beltsville Center. Location Coordinators and Laboratory/Center Directors in Arkansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas received the memo from Onstad that:

Mike Downing, Area Procurement and Realty Officer, as well as point of contact for the Southern Plains Area Biobased Program, has also taken an active role in integrating the Biobased program. Downing's efforts were 2-fold. One memorandum that he sent to the Area Architectural Contractor introduced the Biobased Program, provided biobased resource material, and requested biobased products be incorporated into all future design projects whenever possible. Downing then sent out an area-wide email to all locations/centers requesting status on implementing the biobased Program, successes or problems, and contacts for each location. Recent activity indicates that the Southern Plains Area locations are steadily moving forward with the Biobased Program. The Grazinglands Research Laboratory in El Reno, Texas has already identified and purchased biobased products for farming operations, grounds-keeping, and facilities maintenance. Products purchased include:

ARS' level of commitment is so high that the Southern Plains Area has created an annual award. The "Southern Plains Area Greening Award" recognizes locations that have demonstrated continued effort, progress, and achievement in making environmentally friendly choices. The Conservation and Production Research Laboratory in Bushland, Texas was this year's award winner.

For additional information on the Southern Plains Area Biobased Program contact Mike Downing at 979-260-9446 or email at mdowning@spa.ars.usda.gov.

For additional information on FB4P contact Mike Green at 202-720-7921, email at Mike.GREEN@usda.gov, or visit the Biobased Products Initiative Web site at http://www.biobased.oce.usda.gov/public/index.cfm.

For Immediate Release

 

Contact Mike Green

USDA, Washington, D.C.
June 1, 2004

202-720-7921

Forest Service Proactive in Using Biobased Products

The USDA Forest Service is actively purchasing and using biobased products for composite material signs and watershed restoration structures.

The Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (FSRIA), Section 9002 of Public Law 107-17, mandates the development of a Federal Biobased Products Preferred Procurement Program (FB4P) that requires Federal agencies to purchase biobased products. Products classified as biobased are those commercial and industrial non-food products composed, in whole or significant part, of biological and/or renewable domestic agricultural or forestry materials, such as plant, animal, and marine.

USDA's Secretary Ann M. Veneman says the FB4P, "builds upon President Bush's commitment to promoting energy independence while protecting the environment. This program will improve environmental health by using renewable resources from our farms and forests to produce products, [many which have previously been] derived from fossil energy sources. This program will enhance the development of high performing and environmentally friendly products."

One example involves a patented, fortified wood composite product called AltreeTM, which is being used to make road and interpretive biobased signs. The AltreeTM product consists of small-diameter trees and woody biomass combined with recycled plastic containers and was developed in collaboration with the Forest Service's own Forest Products Laboratory and other groups. The product name is truly representative because all parts of the tree are utilized, including the bark, branches, needles, and berries, resulting in no residual slash upon harvest. Characteristics which make is desirable include density higher than wood, longevity of 35-50 years plus depending on the application, stain resistance, waterproof, UV resistant, impervious to insects, and no leaching of harmful chemicals into the soil.

Endorsements are positive from customers, like Phil Bono, Recreation Technician, Smith River National Recreation Area, Six Rivers National Forest and Vicky Estrada, District Ranger, Mountainair Ranger District, who have both purchased signs. Says Bono, "I am very pleased with the quality of the signs, the low cost, and the quick delivery time. This is a great use for the materials that are removed from the local forests during fuel break construction or thinning operations. I look forward to working with P&M signs in the future." Estrada concurs, "I have worked with P&M Signs over the last 3 years. They have always been very responsive to all our sign requests. AltreeTM has proven to be resistant to weather, gun shots, and porcupines."

Another biobased stand-out purchased by the Forest Service from Forest Concepts, is a product called ELWd® (pronounced el-wood), which uses small-diameter logs and forest residuals to make small logs into bigger logs. These logs are then used to build structures for habitat enhancement, erosion control, and water restoration. ELWd® structures are held together by round mortise and tenon joints with spars joining opposite poles to create an interlocking all-wood structure. Since no bolts, nails, or other fasteners are needed, these structures can be built almost anywhere by untrained workers using simple tooling. The added bonus is that they decay naturally into the environment. Ottawa National Forest (Michigan/Wisconsin) uses ELWd® structures for stream and watershed restoration. Jerry Edde, Forests Fisheries Biologist, Ottawa National Forest says, "ELWd® is fulfilling a longstanding need. It's an easy way to put large woody debris in larger streams. The price is reasonable, the quality of the product is excellent, you do not need heavy equipment to install it, untrained volunteers can easily install it, and the company definitely stands behind their product. We have had a lot of experience with this product and like it. We plan to use the product more widely in the future."

For additional information on the Biobased Procurement Program contact Mike Green at 202-720-7921, e-mail at Mike.GREEN@usda.gov, or visit the Biobased Products Initiative Web site at http://www.biobased.oce.usda.gov/public/index.cfm.

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Appendix M
Environmental Management System Policy

BA POLICY #05-03
March 23, 2005

SUBJECT:

Environmental Management System (Formally BA Policy 02-07 and 03-04)

It is the policy of the Beltsville Area (BA), Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC) to demonstrate its commitment to environmental protection and management through the following: 1) Adherence to applicable regulations of Federal, State, and local Governments, Policies and Procedures of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Agricultural Research Service, and Executive Orders, and 2) Advancement of stewardship of natural resources by using sound management systems and conducting research to reduce impacts of agricultural production on the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, integral with the Pollution Prevention Program. Executive Order 13148 is the foundation of this policy. Executive Order 13101 incorporates requirements for proactive affirmative procurement. Detailed information on the BARC Environmental Management System is at: http://staffonly.ba.ars.usda.gov/sohes

Environmental Management: An Environmental Management System was established that combines the goals of Executive Order 13148, Executive Order 13101, the recommendations of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) 2001 Environmental Management Review, and the benefits of the research programs that are protective of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

Executive Order 13148, Greening the Government through Leadership in Environmental Management:

Executive Order 13101, Greening the Government through Waste Prevention, Recycling, and Federal Acquisition:

Affirmative Procurement: An Affirmative Procurement Program was established at BARC to implement the goals of Executive Order 13101. This program requires all credit card holders to be trained in their responsibilities. RCRA 6002 insures compliance with the requirements established by the EPA for procurement of environmentally preferable products.

Environmental Compliance: Failure to comply with legal requirements and Executive Orders can have serious consequences for the BA and the Agency. Line management accountability for environmental performance is an integral component of this Policy. All BA personnel must act within the scope of their duties to be eligible for the legal protection of the Agency. Violation of any Federal, State, or local law or regulation is not within the scope of any employee's duties. Violations can result in civil or criminal actions and disciplinary action up to and including removal from the Federal Service.

Right-To-Know and Pollution Prevention: BARC informs the public and its employees of possible sources of pollution resulting from facility operations through timely planning and reporting under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and through collection of chemical inventories and Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's). Information on National Priorities List (Superfund) activities are available in the locally maintained Administrative Record. The Pollution Prevention program is all-encompassing and includes nutrient management, chemical management, sustainable agriculture, energy conservation, research related to reducing the impacts of agricultural production on the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, and education/outreach activities.

Toxic Chemical Release Reduction: BARC reduces its releases and transfers of toxic chemicals through innovative pollution prevention and effective facility management and acquisition and procurement practices. Toxic Chemical and Hazardous Substance Use Reduction: BARC reduces the use of specifically selected toxic chemicals, hazardous substances, and pollutants through identification of proven substitutes and established or advanced facility management practices.

Reductions in Ozone-Depleting Substances: BARC has practically eliminated its use of ozone-depleting substances.

Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Landscaping: Cost-effective and environmentally sound landscaping practices are employed to reduce adverse impacts to the environment.

For further information or assistance, contact David A. Prevar, Area Safety and Health Manager, at 301-504-5557.

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Appendix N
Reporting/Implementation Plan
for Executive Order 13123

USDA seal

USDA logo

FY 2006

Implementation Plan for
Executive Order 13123
Greening the Government through
Efficient Energy Management

 

 

January 11, 2006

I. MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

In FY 2006, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) will issue a departmental regulation (DR) that establishes USDA policy for energy and water conservation and utilities management and assigns responsibilities for implementation of this policy. This DR will incorporate goals and requirements contained in the Energy Policy Act of 2005, as well as, other legislation and executive orders. Additionally, the DR will provide guidance on the annual reporting requirements to the Department of Energy (DOE), the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the Congress and the President. Specific DR guidance on energy-efficient products, sustainable buildings design, and other energy-related requirements are provided in Section II of this document.

A. Energy Management Infrastructure

  1. USDA Senior Energy Official

    In accordance with Section 304 of Executive Order 13123, the designated Senior Energy Official for the USDA is the Assistant Secretary for Administration (ASA). The ASA has the authority to implement Federal energy management policy related to the internal operations of USDA, and to exercise full Department-wide contracting and procurement authority.

    Two of USDA's largest agencies, the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the Forest Service (FS), also have agency Senior Energy Officials. The ARS Deputy Administrator for Administrative and Financial Management is the Senior Agency official who has the authority and responsibility for implementing Federal energy management policy related to the internal operations of the agency. FS has designated their Associate Deputy Chief for Business Operations, as the agency's Senior Energy Official; who implements the energy program through the regional, district and field staff.

  2. Agency Energy Team

    Within the ASA organization, the Office of Procurement and Property Management (OPPM) has Departmental responsibility for policy, planning, and reporting, and serves as the primary inter-and intra-Departmental liaison on energy matters related to the facilities and internal operations of the Department. The USDA agencies, in concert with OPPM, are responsible for the identification of appropriate energy conservation actions and programming, budgeting, and implementing the Executive Order 13123 requirements and the USDA Annual Energy Implementation Plan within their own organizations.

    In accordance with Section 305 of Executive Order 13123, USDA has an Energy Support Team comprised of management, procurement, legal, real property, budget, and technical personnel. The team, which is listed on page 4, has representatives from various USDA agencies, including ARS, FS and the Office of Operations (OO), which is a staff office in the ASA organization. While the Department is composed of over twenty agencies and staff offices, the overwhelming majority of facilities ownership and related direct facilities energy consumption is attributable primarily to ARS, FS and OO.

ARS and FS also have established internal energy teams. ARS utilizes the Agency's standard organization at Headquarters, Areas, and Field Locations to achieve the goals of Executive Order (EO) 13123. ARS Headquarters has the overall responsibility for policy, planning, and evaluation for the implementation of the agency's energy program. Within ARS Headquarters, the Facilities Division and the Procurement and Property Division provide inter- and intra-agency liaison on energy matters involving facilities management and procurement and property management programs.

The FS team is lead from Headquarters in Washington, D.C., which works with the regional program managers to implement energy initiatives at the ranger district and national forest level. The team's primary objective is to encourage regional and forest offices to be aware of and to implement energy and water conservation projects and practices to the maximum extent feasible. Focus areas are installation of energy efficient appliances and systems during construction and major renovation, and the use of solar power.

U.S. Department of Agriculture
Energy Support Team

Senior Energy Official:

Boyd K. Rutherford
Assistant Secretary for Administration

Executive Advisor:

Glenn Haggstrom
Deputy Director, Office of Procurement and Property Management (OPPM)
USDA Senior Real Property Executive

Team Leaders:

Sharon H. Holcombe
Chief, Energy and Environmental Division, OPPM
202.720.3820

Charles Johnson
Facilities Energy and Water Program Manager, OPPM
202.720.2941

Legal Adviser:

Benjamin Young
Office, General Counsel
202.720.4076

 

Paula Geiger
Budget Analyst
Office of Budget and Program Analysis
202.720.2385

William Hamele
Assistant Facility Program Manager
Forest Service
703.605.4522

Marsha Pruitt
Real Property Leasing Officer
Property Management Division (OPPM)
202.720.4335

Theresa Stephens
Procurement Analyst
Agricultural Research Service
301.504.1729

Howard Price
Director, Administrative Services
Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service
301.734.5684

Craig McBroome
Real Property Management Specialist
Forest Service
703.605.4550

Mike Green
Program Manager,
Biobased Procurement
Procurement Policy Division (OPPM)
202.720.7921

Ed Murtagh
Staff Engineer
Office of Operations
202.720.5961

Sandy Morgan
Staff Engineer
Agricultural Research Service
301.504.4895

David Dufour
Systems Analyst
National Finance Center
504.255.4830

B. Management Tools

  1. Awards

    USDA will encourage its employees' commitment to improving energy efficiency through awards and recognition programs. USDA will continue to participate in the Annual Federal Energy and Water Management Awards program and the "You Have the Power" recognition program. USDA plans to submit FY 2006 nominations for these award programs to recognize outstanding energy efficiency and water conservation efforts.

    USDA agencies will conduct their own employee award and recognition programs that cover a broad-range of categories, including energy efficiency and conservation. The Forest Service will develop an incentive awards program for employees to showcase energy reduction, and continue to confer its annual award for energy efficiency. ARS will continue to use existing employee incentives and awards program of the agency to reward exceptional performance in energy management. The Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyard Administration (GIPSA) will encourage its supervisors to use spot awards and other incentive programs to recognize efforts that reduce energy consumption.



  2. Performance Evaluations

    Within USDA headquarters, the Office of Procurement and Property Management and the Office of Operations will continue to incorporate energy management responsibilities as an element in position descriptions and performance evaluation standards of its personnel considered to be critical to the implementation of Executive Order 13123.

    Also, in FY 2006, ARS will continue to incorporate energy management responsibilities as an element in position descriptions of agency personnel considered to be critical to the implementation of this order (e.g., facility managers, area and location engineers, building engineers, maintenance mechanics, energy managers, engineering project managers, and procurement personnel). ARS and its areas and locations will also revise performance standards for applicable positions to include a statement that will allow exceptional performance to be measured in implementing EO 13123.

    The Forest Service will update position descriptions of all supervisors to include energy conservation; while GIPSA Plans to incorporate energy management responsibilities in certain energy-related position descriptions and performance evaluation standards and operating procedures.



  3. Training and Education

    To promote energy awareness, education and training, OPPM will continue to disseminate various educational and awareness material (provided by FEMP and the "you Have the Power" campaign) throughout the year to agency facility and energy managers. OPPM will continue to direct USDA personnel to its Facilities Energy website, which will be updated and enhanced in FY 2006. In addition to attending the Energy 2006 conference and Certified Energy Management courses; OPPM staff will also solicit participation in these courses and events from various USDA agency personnel.

    OPPM will promote awareness of energy requirements and reporting through the USDA Corporate Property Asset Information System (CPAIS), which was implemented in FY 2004. Additionally, OPPM plans to raise the level of participation and visibility of USDA in Government-wide energy management initiatives while increasing the awareness of these initiatives within the Department. Specifically, OPPM will continue to facilitate facility-level participation in the Federal Electronics Challenge and the Government-wide High Performance Building MOU. OPPM will also ensure coordination between USDA's involvement with the Federal Green Building Council and the Department's responsibilities pertaining to the Executive Order on Federal Real Property Asset Management (E.O. 13327).

    USDA agencies will ensure relevant energy management training and awareness materials are provided to both procurement and facility management personnel. Agencies will continue to provide relevant energy management training and materials to its employees to keep awareness at a high level. Appropriate personnel will also be encouraged to attend training program and workshops provided by the Federal Energy Management program, private and public institutions, and other Federal agencies. Facility managers will be encouraged to establish energy committees, representing a cross section of employees within their jurisdiction and, to the greatest extent possible, involve these committees in energy management decision making.

    Within ARS, it is anticipated that personnel will participate in a variety of training and awareness programs throughout FY 2006. For instance, Headquarters Facilities Division will continue to send representatives to the Laboratories for the 21st Century annual conference. Additionally, the building engineer, building manager, and maintenance mechanics within the National Agricultural Library will be required to take training and educational lectures that focus on energy management issues.



  4. Showcase Facilities

    USDA agencies will continue to designate buildings as showcases that incorporate advanced technologies and practices for energy efficiency and conservation. Exhibits will be developed identifying aspects of energy conservation measures utilized in these projects. USDA Headquarters South Building Modernization will result in a Showcase facility of about two million square feet when all eight phases are completed.

    ARS will select and designate at least one major new construction or major modernization of existing building project as an energy showcase. The design of these designated energy showcase building projects will incorporate advanced technologies and practices for energy efficiency, water conservation, or use of solar and other renewable energy.



II. IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES

In FY 2006, USDA plans to employ a variety of actions in accordance with the President's September 26, 2005 memorandum on energy and fuel conservation actions in response to hurricanes Katrina and Rita. These planned FY 2006 activities, which cross-cuts some of the implementation strategies discussed below, generally fall into one of three categories: (1) employee awareness and communications, (2) procurement of energy-efficient equipment, and (3) modified processes and methodologies.

A. Life Cycle Cost Analysis

In accordance with Section 401 of Executive Order 13123, agencies and offices within USDA will use life cycle cost analysis in making decisions about investments in products, services, construction, and other projects to lower the department's costs and to reduce energy and water consumption. Where appropriate, USDA agencies will consider the life cycle costs of combinations of projects, particularly to encourage bundling of energy-efficiency projects with renewable energy projects.

ARS will use life-cycle costing and value engineering to identify opportunities to reduce capital and operating costs of a new major construction or renovation projects scheduled for a design award in FY 2006. The design of new buildings and facilities, and the application of energy conservation measures to existing buildings, shall be made using the life cycle cost methods and procedures of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Handbook 135, "Life Cycle Costing Manual for Federal Energy Management Program".

The Forest will integrate life cycle cost analysis into project designs and incorporate these requirements into the Forest Service Manual. The Forest Service Technology and Development Center is currently evaluating existing life cycle costing tools for suitability for Forest Service use. Once this evaluation is complete (end of FY 2006 or early FY 2007) the Forest Service will develop and implement corresponding policy.

B. Facility Energy Audits

USDA agencies will use comprehensive energy audits to identify potential projects. Energy efficiency projects will be ranked in descending order of the savings to investment ratios determined using life cycle cost methodologies. In addition, renovation projects will include an energy analysis during the conceptual phase to identify potential opportunities. New energy conservation technologies will be considered in appropriate repair and construction projects.

ARS plans to conduct energy and water audits for select facilities in FY 2006, either independently with appropriated funding, as available, or through energy savings performance contracts or utility energy-efficiency service contracts. Specifically, ARS will focus its auditing efforts on research laboratory and other high energy consuming facilities with at least 10,000 square feet of conditioned space. As audits are completed, ARS will continue to identify and implement projects that improve energy efficiency and offer potential use of renewable energy and technologies.

C. Financing Mechanisms

OPPM staff will continue to encourage USDA agencies to take advantage of ESPCs and UESCs, when life-cycle cost effective, to reduce energy and cost in facilities and operations. In FY 2006, USDA agencies will review completed audit reports and identify additional sites with potential for energy savings performance contract and/or utility energy service contract projects.

It is anticipated that USDA agencies will continue to receive annual benefits in reduced energy usage from ESPCs and UESCs awarded in previous fiscal years.

D. ENERGY STAR® and Other Energy Efficient Products

In FY 2006, an aggressive approach will be taken in evaluating products, equipment, and appliances for energy efficiency during the review process of renovations, replacements and product purchases. USDA will issue a departmental regulation (DR) that establishes USDA policy for energy and water conservation and utilities management in USDA owned and leased buildings. This policy will require agencies to, as feasible, purchase ENERGY STAR® labeled products, or products designated as being in the upper 25% of equivalent products for energy efficiency. Under the DR, agencies will also be required to purchase equipment that uses no more than one watt of stand-by power, or if impracticable, purchase items with the lowest standby wattage available.

E. ENERGY STAR® Buildings

In FY 2006, USDA will issue a departmental regulation (DR) that establishes USDA policy for energy and water conservation and utilities management in USDA facilities. This policy will require agencies to, as feasible, apply the ENERGY STAR® Building Design in the design and construction or major renovation of USDA owned buildings.

In conjunction with the conduct of facility energy audits, USDA agencies will review facilities against the established ENERGY STAR® Building criteria. Based on this review, agencies will apply or implement necessary improvements to eligible buildings, as appropriate. The Forest Service has adopted an accountable requirement to design and certify offices, visitor centers, and climate controlled warehouses greater than 2,500 square feet to the LEED Silver rating.

F. Sustainable Building Design

Sustainable development and design principles are emphasized in the design and construction process used by USDA agencies to ensure new facilities incorporate current energy management technology within budgetary constraints. In FY 2006, USDA will issue a departmental regulation (DR) that establishes USDA policy for energy and water conservation and utilities management in USDA facilities. This policy will require agencies to, as feasible, apply the ENERGY STAR® Building Design, and/or Laboratories for the 21st Century (LABS21) approach, and/or design for, at a minimum, a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver rating in the design and construction or major renovation of USDA owned buildings. Also, in January 2006, USDA will participate in the White House Summit on Sustainable Buildings where the Department will sign as a party to the Federal Government's High Performance Sustainable Buildings MOU.

ARS will continue to apply sustainable building design principles into the siting, design, and construction of new facilities as appropriate. The ARS Facilities Division will continue to emphasize sustainable building design principles and discuss sustainable design principles as part of customer/research program representative orientation to increase awareness of project teams.

The Forest Service will use the recently released Built Environment Image Guide (BEIG) to support sustainable building design and construction. The BEIG discusses sustainable building design principles extensively and provides implementation direction; the Forest Service Manual is being modified to require that field units refer to the BEIG for new construction and major renovations. Additionally, the Forest Service's National Facilities Workshop contains a session on sustainable design for all of the program managers.

G. Energy Efficiency in Lease Provisions

In FY 2006, USDA will issue a departmental regulation (DR) that establishes USDA policy for energy and water conservation and utilities management in USDA owned and leased facilities. When issued, the DR, in accordance with EPACT 2005, will require USDA and its agencies to strive to meet an energy consumption reduction goal of 2% in FY 2006 based on FY 2003 levels. In leasing buildings for its own use or that of another agency, each USDA agency will give appropriate preference to buildings which minimize life cycle costs.

When entering into leases in FY 2006, including the renegotiation or extension of existing leases, ARS and the Forest Service will incorporate lease provisions that encourage energy and water efficiency wherever life cycle cost effective. ARS will comply with the energy conservation guidelines set forth in 10 CFR Part 436 (Federal Energy Management and Planning Programs.) Also, ARS will ensure that all new lease contracts are in conformance with the policies prescribed in section 101-20.107 of the Federal Property Management Regulations. Existing lease contracts are administered in accordance with these policies to the maximum extent feasible.

H. Industrial Facility Efficiency Improvements

In conjunction with the comprehensive audits of inventory of facilities, USDA agencies will continue to identify/implement life-cycle cost-effective opportunities to improve energy efficiency, use of renewable energy and technologies, water conservation measures, reduction of petroleum fuel use in facilities and operations. Agencies will continue to take advantage of early retirement of older, inefficient appliances and other energy and water using equipment in the Agency's facilities. Agencies will continue to pursue switching to less greenhouse gas-intensive, non petroleum energy sources, such as natural gas or renewable energy sources, and by decreasing unnecessary fuel use through efficiency projects USDA agencies will continue auditing and retrofitting facilities for energy and water efficiency and expand the use of renewable energy and technologies, to the greatest extent possible, subject to available funding. Agencies will take advantage of ESPC's, and UESC's to help finance projects.

I. Highly Efficient Systems

In FY 2006, USDA will encourage its agencies to make energy efficiency a priority whenever new construction and retrofit projects are planned. USDA agencies will pursue combined heating/cooling/power systems projects, when life-cycle cost effective. Facilities will be targeted for such projects where there is a high demand for hot water or cooling for process needs and where low cost fuel (such as natural gas or biomass) are readily accessible.

In conjunction with facility energy audits, ARS will identify life-cycle cost-effective opportunities for greater use of district energy systems or cogeneration systems. Additionally, ARS will continue to coordinate with university and research institutions with which ARS is co located to ensure central plant systems are operated efficiently. Furthermore, ARS will survey local natural resources to optimize use of available biomass, bio energy, geothermal, or other naturally occurring energy sources.

J. Distributed Generation

In FY 2006, FS will continue to use solar and other renewable technology, particularly at remote locations, where it competes favorably with traditional power systems. Specifically, FS regions will incorporate solar power to run pumps and exhaust fans at recreation sites; wind power will also be used at a limited number of sites.

In conjunction with the facility energy audit, ARS will identify and evaluate current use of off-grid generation systems within the agency. Based on this review, ARS will consider off-grid electricity opportunities that provide energy benefits and when life-cycle-cost effective.

K. Electrical Load Reduction Measures

USDA agencies are accountable for being responsible electrical power consumers and will coordinate with utility companies to minimize overall use of electricity and manage electricity consumption during emergencies.

Top

Appendix O
Closing the Circle Award

BARC WINS ANOTHER CLOSING THE CIRCLE AWARD

BARC received a Closing the Circle Award for its use of biobased products from the White House Task Force on Waste Prevention and Recycling. The award ceremony will be held on June 10, 2003 in the White House Presidential Hall of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, when 26 Federal military and civilian award winners (individuals and teams) in several categories of environmental stewardship will be recognized. This is the third straight year that BARC has received a Closing the Circle Award. Two years ago, the award was for biodiesel fuel leadership, and last year it was for the Environmental Management System, which created an alliance between the ongoing research and the management of day-to-day operations. The Closing the Circle Awards program is administered by the Office of the Federal Environmental Executive, whose mission is to promote sustainable environmental stewardship throughout the Federal Government.

The Biobased Products Program is integral with BARC's Affirmative Procurement Program. The authority for these programs is promulgated in BA Policy #03-04, Environmentally Preferable Products and Affirmative Procurement. The following is a summary of what BA has been doing in environmentally preferable purchasing and biobased products use. BARC has long practiced pollution prevention, and years ago incorporated waste prevention and recycling in its daily operations. We have also been increasing use of Environmentally Preferable Products, especially biobased products. Environmentally preferable products are chosen after considering price and performance, pollution prevention, life cycle environmental attributes, comparison of environmental impacts, and evaluation of the actual performance of the products.

First, a summary on biodiesel. Since August 1, 1999 BARC has been a leader in the use of biodiesel fuel and biobased products. On that date, BARC received its first delivery of biodiesel fuel. The storage tanks were filled with 80% diesel and then splashed-blended with 20% biodiesel to make a B-20 blend. At that moment BARC began using biodiesel in approximately 150 vehicles and equipment. In October 2000, BARC expanded the use of biodiesel to its heating plants. In lieu of Number 2 heating oil, BARC began and continues to use biodiesel. At the same time BARC implemented a policy that all back-up generators would be fueled with biodiesel. It is noted that during a major emergency (F-4 tornado) the generators operated without any disruptions.

BARC expanded its leadership position by holding seminars for Federal, State and local officials on the benefits of biodiesel. This resulted in many public agencies switching to the use of biodiesel in all their vehicles and equipment. BARC staff also conducted workshops at Federal Fleet Conferences and Clean Air Conferences. This again resulted in more agencies using biodiesel. Staff also spoke at environmentally sponsored functions where Congressional staff were invited and did radio interviews on the benefits of biodiesel and biobased products. BARC also had the ARS National Visitor Center bus wrapped in a decal that promotes the fact that the bus is soybean powered and running on biodiesel fuel. This bus has been used in Washington, D.C. for special events, at Clean Air Conferences and other functions where vast numbers of the general public can see the wrap and learn about biodiesel.

At the same time BARC began working closely with the Department of Defense, Defense Energy Supply Center (DESC) to purchase biodiesel pre-blended and in large quantities so that the cost would be reduced and it would be easy for Defense and Civilian Agencies to purchase the fuel. This would be a means to increase the use of the product. In July 2002, DESC awarded a contract in excess of $1M and began purchasing biodiesel.

The Utilities Services Section uses biodegradable cleaning products; citrus-based industrial degreaser, hand soap, and hand-scrubber cleaner; and CFC-free electrical cleaner. In addition, the boiler water treatment is food-service quality.

Within the Operations and Maintenance Section, which includes carpentry, paint, pipe & metal, and refrigeration shops, the hand cleaners, metal and parts cleaners, and condenser and evaporator coil cleaners are all biobased. An environmentally safe antifreeze, REM-1, is used in all chillers. Other products used include latex paints with low odor and low volatility; water-based wood finishes; solvent-free adhesive for vinyl tiles; and fluorescent tubes that are both longer-life and less hazardous for disposal. Chlorine-free HFC refrigerant is purchased on a regular basis and utilized in lieu of products that are harmful to the environment and contribute to ozone depletion.

The Farm Operations Branch uses biobased 2-cycle oil, gear lubricant, hydraulic fluid for tractors, lithium grease for high-pressure applications, anti-wear hydraulic oil, chainsaw bar & chain lubricant, and oil cutter. They are currently phasing in the use of biobased products for penetrating fluid, power steering fluid, and engine oil.

On occasion, spills of petroleum products occur, despite our spill prevention plans. When this happens, spill kits that are made of environmentally friendly products are used for cleanup. If a larger spill occurs, environmentally friendly containment and absorbent materials are used. One of the absorbent products used is derived from recycled corn cobs. After use on a spill, the cleanup material is picked up by a recycling plant for use as a higher BTU fuel instead of being disposed of as hazardous waste. This is a prime example of how products are chosen for life cycle environmental attributes.

Even the Radiation Safety Unit uses a biobased product, for surface contamination cleanups. This underscores how environmental preferability is part of the culture at BARC.

The combined participation of BARC's maintenance shops, utilities services, and farm operations in selecting environmentally preferable products results in using greater than 250 gallons and 200 pounds per year of green products.

Environmentally preferable services are similarly evaluated before implementation. The hazardous waste contract specifies recycling chemicals instead of treatment or disposal whenever possible. In the past year, this amounted to greater than 2,875 pounds. The paper recycling program was expanded by modifying the housekeeping contract to include pickup of mixed paper, including the ubiquitous catalogs the large research center receives, and providing larger wheeled recycling containers to encourage liberal use. Additional vendors have been found to expand recycling in other areas. The Utilities Service Section recycles any oil-based product it has to use. The Carpentry Shop recycles sawdust and wood scraps. All used oil is picked up at no cost to the Government. The vendor then takes the product and recycles it for reuse.

Included in the specifications for a new janitorial contract was the requirement to use environmentally preferable products. Currently used are biobased/biodegradable cleaners for various surfaces, disinfectants, carpet spotters, and handsoap. The hand towels and bathroom tissue are of recycled content.

Slate roof replacements and roofs in new construction are being done with recycled-content roofing tiles that have the appearance of slate, meet historical preservation standards, and are less expensive than slate. This became policy after replacing roofs on four buildings after the tornado in 2001. We have also been specifying carpet with soybean-based backing.

We have eliminated the use of ozone-depleting fire suppression systems, fire extinguishers, and refrigerants at BARC.

Several processes have been implemented that are significantly less expensive, or of greater benefit to the environment. In the Utilities Services Section, the amount of chemicals at the two wastewater treatment plants is minimized through tight monitoring and use of flow-paced feed metering. The wastewater treatment plants utilize biological treatment processes, called Biological Nutrient Removal, minimizing chemicals; and timers are used to lower costs of running equipment. A plan was developed and implemented to repair leaks in the condensate returns to the boilers. This significantly reduced water/effluent consumption in the boiler plants, especially during the heating season. Also, this reduced the amount of chemicals needed to treat the water because the condensate water was previously treated, thereby reducing the purchase of treatment chemicals. Whenever possible, chemical containers are recycled or reused.

Scientists use aqueous-based scintillation fluid (used for counting isotope activity) to the greatest extent practical, replacing volatile solvent-based fluid.

The composting facility processes 10,000 cubic yards of organic waste per year, producing 5,000 cubic yards of compost.

Outreach to the larger population about environmentally preferable products is a priority at BARC. During the last 12 months, staff gave a presentation at a Congressional program on the benefits of biodiesel fuel; spoke to public officials in Breckenridge, Colorado on biodiesel fuel; and participated in a 50-minute radio interview on biodiesel and environmentally friendly products on a public radio broadcast. In addition, each year BARC holds a Public Field Day in June. In 2002, approximately 7,000 people attended the event. Visitors learn about the research being conducted, see an exhibit on biodiesel, see the biodiesel Visitor Center Bus in action, and go on a hay ride pulled by a tractor operating on biodiesel.

Online Affirmative Procurement Program training was developed to assure that all BA Government purchase card users will be aware of and participate in the Program. Cardholders will soon receive instructions for taking the course. Names of employees completing the training will be monitored within the Safety, Occupational Health and Environmental Staff to assure that everyone is "on board." A manual detailing the program to serve as a reference for decisionmakers, such as procurement and contracting officials, has been developed. To minimize use of paper, it will be distributed electronically.

David A. Prevar, Area Safety and Health Manager